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Perhaps I over analyse too

Posted by Lotg on August 24, 2003

In Reply to: A couple of points posted by Henry on August 23, 2003

: : : : : : : what I trying to work on is to make this below sentence more creative

: : : : : : : "They celebrated their wedding on 18th August 2003 at Garden City, INDIA."

: : : : : : I'll leave the creativity to someone else, but you might like to weave these into it:

: : : : : : A mail order bride
: : : : : : A mixed marriage
: : : : : : Always the bridesmaid never a bride
: : : : : : An open marriage
: : : : : : Happy is the bride the sun shines on
: : : : : : Here comes the bride
: : : : : : In sickness and in health
: : : : : : Join in marriage
: : : : : : Last taste of freedom
: : : : : : Love and marriage go together like a horse and carriage
: : : : : : Shotgun wedding
: : : : : : Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue
: : : : : : Stand on ceremony
: : : : : : Take your hand in marriage
: : : : : : The blushing bride
: : : : : : The bride to be
: : : : : : Tie the knot
: : : : : : Till death do us part
: : : : : : To have and to hold
: : : : : : Two on the aisle
: : : : : : Wedding tackle

: : : : : But not ALL of them, please.

: : : : Love bloomed in Garden City ...

: : : and she had a face like a rose - well, that's better than rose hips.

: : A couple doesn't exactly celebrate a wedding (see original query). They have a wedding to solemnize their marriage. They may celebrate afterward, at the reception.

: An interesting point! However, a priest or an official in a registry office would celebrate the wedding ceremony ie perform it in public. As you say, RBerg, the bride and groom would celebrate afterwards. In due course, they should also be able to celebrate their wedding anniversary.

: Incidentally, the posting also demonstrates the use of number with the word couple. 'A couple doesn't exactly celebrate a wedding. They have a wedding to solemnize their marriage.' Couple exhibits both singular and plural number. I certainly wouldn't say 'It has a wedding to solemnize its marriage.' And whilst one couple could celebrate another couple's wedding, I wouldn't say 'A couple doesn't exactly celebrate its wedding'. Its not easy to be unambiguous. Is it permissible to say 'A couple doesn't (or don't) exactly celebrate their wedding'?

:::: Hmmm. Perhaps you overanalyse. To begin with, the writer seemed to be looking for a better way to announce this event, not to have the term analysed. But if we're going to over analyse, the writer's words were "They celebrated their wedding on 18th August 2003 at Garden City, INDIA." So why have you assumed otherwise? How do you know he's not announcing the celebration of the event and not the event itself? His examples don't really clearly explain that. Such phrases as 'mail order bride' do make me wonder exactly what he is trying to describe.

And on a totally non-analytical note, maybe you didn't celebrate during your wedding - that's your sad problem, I certainly did.

Anyway, back to over analysing, I would take Henry's question to be, how can I better describe the celebration of the event.

So what's the story Henry, what exactly are you after, a better way to write about the wedding event itself, or the celebration thereafter, or perhaps, like my own 2 weddings, both can be combined?