Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"weather" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word weather

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word weather

" Brass monkey weather "
Meaning:
Extremely cold weather. The full expression is 'Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey'.
Example:
The weatherman says minus 10 degrees and strong winds for tomorrow. That's brass monkey weather.
Where did it originate?:
The UK and USA in the early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, mostly among people in their 20/40s, as a slang expression.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   slang  
" Currant bun "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sun.
Example:
It's rained every day for ages. I can't remember the last time I saw the currant bun.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   food  
" Dog days of summer "
Meaning:
The hottest days of the summer season.
Example:
I'm roasting - I suppose we should expect that on the dog days.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 14th century, deriving ultimately from ancient Rome.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   latin  
" It never rains but it pours "
Meaning:
When troubles come they often come together.
Example:
The boiler broke down, the weather turned freezing and Jack's got the flu. It never rains but it pours!
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but somewhat old-fashioned.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   aphorism  
" On cloud nine "
Meaning:
Blissfully happy.
Example:
The day after George proposed to her, Mildred won the lottery. She's on cloud nine.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   happiness   america  
" Potatoes (or taters) in the mould "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for cold.
Example:
Whoa, it's the coldest day of the winter so far - really taters.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Raining cats and dogs "
Meaning:
Raining very heavily.
Example:
The monsoon will be here soon - then it will rain cats and dogs.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   excess  
" Under the weather "
Meaning:
Feeling ill.
Example:
I've had a sore throat all week, now it's turned to a cold. I'm feeling right under the weather.
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More idioms about:   medical  
" Winter drawers on "
Meaning:
British euphemistic joke.
Example:
Autumn is over and these summer clothes aren't keeping the cold out - winter drawers on I suppose.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century. A pun on the expression 'winter draws on' (that is, winter is approaching). 'Drawers' is a British slang term for knickers.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   date   clothes   euphemism  

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