Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"water" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word water

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word water

" A fish out of water "
Meaning:
Someone in an unfamiliar circumstance.
Example:
He’s a fine golfer but in this dance competition he’s a fish out of water.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals  
" Adam’s ale "
Meaning:
A reference to water - often used to emphasize the purity of water compared to other drinks.
Example:
I didn’t want a beer when I finished the marathon - Adam’s ale was all I needed.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common in the UK.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  
" Big fish in a small pond "
Meaning:
An important person but only so within a small area of influence.
Example:
Alison is the queen of the post room. She's a big fish in a small pond though - no one in the rest of the company knows who she is.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   animals   america  
" Blood is thicker than water "
Meaning:
Family loyalties are stronger than those to other people.
Example:
It was just me and his son in the job interview. I had no chance, blood is thicker than water you know.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. Probably coined by Sir Walter Scott, 1815.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   nature   aphorism  
" Come hell or high water "
Meaning:
Despite any great difficult or obstacle.
Example:
I'm going to get to Cornwall by nightfall, come hell or high water.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   religion   america  
" Little fish in a big pond "
Meaning:
Someone considered unimportant compared to their more significant peers.
Example:
Jimmy's first school only had seven pupils and he was the star, but when he got to high-school he was a little fish in a big pond.
Where did it originate?:
USA, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   nature   america  
" Water under the bridge "
Meaning:
A past experience that you prefer not to affect your current life.
Example:
Losing my wife and my job was difficult at the time but I've moved on. Its all water under the bridge now.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   emotion  
" You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink "
Meaning:
You can encourage someone to to do something but, in the end, what they do is their own choice.
Example:
I bought her a car; I even paid for the driving lessons, but she still travels everywhere by bus.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 12th century. One of the oldest proverbs in the English language
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   proverbial  

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