Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"vehicle" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word vehicle

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word vehicle

" Back seat driver "
Meaning:
Someone who criticizes from the side-lines without being directly involved.
Example:
She's always ready to be a back seat driver and tell people what to do but she never does anything herself.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel   america  
" City bike "
Meaning:
A bicycle designing especially for urban riding.
Example:
It's more comfortable in a car but in London you get around much quicker on a city bike.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Predominantly used in urban areas in USA and UK.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel   america  
" Fell off the back of a lorry "
Meaning:
A coy reference to an item that has been stolen.
Example:
That iPad I just bought in the pub was really cheap. Best not to ask me where it came from. Let's just say it fell off the back of a lorry.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid/late 20th century. The USA has a 'fell off the back of a truck' variant.
Where is it used?:
Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   crime  
" In the same boat "
Meaning:
Jointly facing the same predicament.
Example:
The fog has grounded all the planes and no one is going anywhere. it's annoying but I suppose were all in the same boat.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel  
" Miss the boat "
Meaning:
Missed the chance to take an opportunity.
Example:
I should have asked him for that loan when he was in a good mood. Now he's fed up because he's lost at golf and I've missed the boat.
Where did it originate?:
The origin of this expression is uncertain. An early 1930 reference describe it as an Americanism, but that reference is from England and there are no earlier known uses from the USA.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel  

 We are also on Facebook

 Copyright Gary Martin, 2019