Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"travel" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word travel

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word travel

" Back seat driver "
Meaning:
Someone who criticizes from the side-lines without being directly involved.
Example:
She's always ready to be a back seat driver and tell people what to do but she never does anything herself.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   vehicle   america  
" City bike "
Meaning:
A bicycle designing especially for urban riding.
Example:
It's more comfortable in a car but in London you get around much quicker on a city bike.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Predominantly used in urban areas in USA and UK.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   vehicle   america  
" Cloud cuckoo-land "
Meaning:
An imaginary idealistic state where everything is perfect. It is usually used with reference to someone who has an overly optimistic and unrealistic belief.
Example:
If you think you can get a managerial job without any qualifications or experience you are living in cloud cuckoo-land.
Where did it originate?:
'Cloud cuckoo-land' derives from a comment made by was coined by the 4th century BC Greek playwright Aristophanes in the whimsical and extravagant play The Birds. First used in English in the 1820s, in the United Kingdom.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   madness   animals   greek_origin  
" Corduroy road "
Meaning:
A road that is ridged and furrowed like the fabric.
Example:
This road can't have been resurfaced since the 1980s. It's all patches - a real corduroy road.
Where did it originate?:
Canada, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not commonplace.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Designated driver "
Meaning:
Someone who agrees not to drink alcohol at a social event in order to be sober enough to drive others home.
Example:
It really wasn't my turn to be designated driver this week but I was late arriving and by the time I got there all the others were already drunk.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1980s
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   america  
" Frog and toad "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for road.
Example:
Hurry up and move the car - I can see a traffic warden coming just down the frog and toad.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Go the extra mile "
Meaning:
Going beyond what is usually required. Make an extra effort.
Example:
He needed have picked me up from the airport. I'm grateful that he went the extra mile.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   america  
" High season "
Meaning:
The most popular time to visit a resort or attraction - when prices are highest.
Example:
It's way too busy here to get a deckchair on the beach. I suppose that's what we should have expected when we booked a holiday in high season.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   date  
" I'm good to go "
Meaning:
I am ready to participate.
Example:
Sorry to hold you up. Just let me get my car keys from my other coat and I'll be good to go.
Where did it originate?:
" In the same boat "
Meaning:
Jointly facing the same predicament.
Example:
The fog has grounded all the planes and no one is going anywhere. it's annoying but I suppose were all in the same boat.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   vehicle  
" Jam jar "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for car.
Example:
Check my new Audi. Its the best jam jar I've ever owned.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Miss the boat "
Meaning:
Missed the chance to take an opportunity.
Example:
I should have asked him for that loan when he was in a good mood. Now he's fed up because he's lost at golf and I've missed the boat.
Where did it originate?:
The origin of this expression is uncertain. An early 1930 reference describe it as an Americanism, but that reference is from England and there are no earlier known uses from the USA.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   vehicle  
" Pedal to the metal "
Meaning:
To go at full speed, when driving a vehicle.
Example:
Well never make it to the hospital in time at this speed. Put the pedal to the metal and hurry things up.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1970s
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   excess   america  
" Riding shotgun "
Meaning:
Riding in the front passenger seat of a car.
Example:
I prefer to drive but since my drink conviction I have to ride shotgun.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid 20th century. Initially heard in the dialogue of cowboy films.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  

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