Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"tool" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word tool

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word tool

" A bad workman always blames his tools "
Meaning:
A proverb that suggests a poor workman tends to look for an excuse for his poor work.
Example:
It was really Andy’s fault that the wall he built fell down but he tried to claim that the cement mixer was faulty.
Where did it originate?:
The expression is found in British collections of proverbs from the 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but less commonly than 50 years ago.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   work   proverbial   aphorism  
" A sledgehammer to crack a nut "
Meaning:
The use of excessive resources to overcome a small problem.
Example:
Using the air ambulance to get granny to hospital was a sledgehammer to crack a nut. She could walk perfectly well and we only live 200 yards away.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   america   food  
" Caught between two stools "
Meaning:
Finding it difficult to choose between two alternatives.
Example:
I'd like to go to the game and stay in for the birthday party. I'm between two stools.
Where did it originate?:
14th century Britain.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but less commonly so that in the past.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   household_items   number  

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