Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"theatre" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word theatre

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word theatre

" Break a leg "
Meaning:
A superstitious way to wish 'good luck' to an actor before a performance while avoiding saying 'good luck' out loud, which is considered unlucky.
Example:
People often said 'break a leg' to Olivier, but he didn't really need it.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   america  
" Dry run "
Meaning:
A rehearsal.
Example:
We need more practice. Let's have another dry run.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Flea pit "
Meaning:
A downmarket cinema - allegedly verminous.
Example:
When we were kids we used to go to the local flea pit every saturday to watch B-movies.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   slang  
" Hocus pocus "
Meaning:
A term used to denote magic or trickery.
Example:
He claimed to have evidence of the Loch Ness Monster, but it turned out to be a lot of hocus pocus.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   trickery   reduplication  
" Last but not least "
Meaning:
An introduction, intended to let the audience know that the last person mentioned is not the least important.
Example:
We've heard from Paul McCartney and George Clooney, and now, least but not least, Marlon Brando.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Steal someones thunder "
Meaning:
Take the credit for something someone else did.
Example:
Joseph Swan had the first working lightbulb but Edison filed the first patent and effectively stole Swan's thunder.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 18th century. From a reference to the machines used in theatres to make the sound of thunder.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature  

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