Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"sport" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word sport

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word sport

" Back to square one "
Meaning:
Back to the beginning.
Example:
He had nearly climbed the cliff before he slipped off. Now it's back to square one.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
In the UK, but less so than a few years ago.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   failure  
" Bat from the pavilion end "
Meaning:
Slang term for a homosexuality.
Example:
If Julian didn't want us to know he was batting from the pavilion end he shouldn't keep wearing those lilac loafers.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century. An allusion to the game of cricket.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location   sex   euphemism   slang  
" Be a sport "
Meaning:
Be generous and/or sportsmanlike.
Example:
Sorry Mr. Jones our ball is in your rose bed again. Be a sport and throw it back over the fence.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Boat race "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for face.
Example:
Stupid am I! Look into my boat and say that again!
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   the_human_body  
" Bring your A game "
Meaning:
Perform to the best of your ability.
Example:
The cup game tomorrow is the biggest in the club's history. Everyone in the team needs to bring his A game.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   america  
" Double header "
Meaning:
A sports expression denoting two events held at the same time.
Example:
The semi-finals are always played together as a double-header to give no team an advantage.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   america  
" Face card "
Meaning:
The jack queen or king in a set of playing cards.
Example:
Cutting the pack and getting a face card isn't as unlikely as some might think - there's a 23% chance of that.
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" Field day "
Meaning:
A day noted for remarkable or exciting events.
Example:
When my daughter was married everyone had a real field day.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature  
" Hat trick "
Meaning:
A threefold feat in sports or some other activity.
Example:
Warne was really on good bowling form today - three wickets in three deliveries. That's the first hat-trick in the match.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes  
" Level playing field "
Meaning:
Fair competition where no side has an advantage.
Example:
There were six of them and only four of us, so it wasn't really a level playing field.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   america  
" Peg out "
Meaning:
1. To die, especially to die of old age. 2. To complete a circuit of the board in the card game cribbage.
Example:
1. Gran had been bedridden for months and finally pegged out yesterday. 2. Just six more holes to go - if I get three nines I'll be able to peg out.
Where did it originate?:
1. USA, mid 19th century. 2. Britain, mid 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   america  
" Play safe "
Meaning:
Avoid risk.
Example:
We could have invested in that new stock but we decided to play safe and wait for a more secure place for our money.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   risk   america  
" Saved by the bell "
Meaning:
Saved by a last minute intervention.
Example:
That solar panel scheme was just about to be cancelled, then an environmentalist minister came in and it was saved by the bell.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century. Not connected, as is often thought, to bells attatched to coffins.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cliche  
" The ball is in your court "
Meaning:
It is your turn to make a decision.
Example:
I've done more than my share in this partnership. The ball is in your court to decide what happens next.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" The sound of leather on willow "
Meaning:
The sound of the ball on the bat in cricket.
Example:
There's nothing more English than this - sitting in a deckchair at the Worcester county ground, watching the match and the sound of leather on willow.
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More idioms about:   nature  
" Throw the towel in "
Meaning:
Give up, especially to avoid further punishment when facing certain defeat.
Example:
AltaVista tried to hang on and compete with Google, but eventually they just couldn't compete and were forced to throw the towel in.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1910s. The allusion is to a boxing match where throwing the towel in indicates a concession
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict   household_items   america  
" Work out "
Meaning:
1. Calculate using arithmetic. 2. Take exercise (also spelled 'workout').
Example:
1. We decided to share the bill for the taxi. My part worked out to four pounds. 2. I've joined the gym. My plan is to work out once a week.
Where did it originate?:
1. Britain, 16th century. 2. (As 'workout') USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Both forms used Worldwide.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   america  

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