Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"slang" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word slang

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word slang

" A bull and cow "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for a row or argument.
Example:
They were shouting and screaming at each other - a real bull and cow.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly in the UK, but occasionally elsewhere too.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict   cockney_rhyming_slang   animals  
" A bunch of fives "
Meaning:
A fist, as used in a fight.
Example:
Punch me would you? How’d you like a bunch of fives in your eye?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly in the UK, but occasionally elsewhere too.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict   the_human_body  
" A load of cobblers "
Meaning:
Nonsense.
Example:
He says he has invented a perpetual motion machine, which is clearly a load of cobblers.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used, especially in the UK. Slang and borderline swearing - not one for your Grandma.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity   cockney_rhyming_slang   nonsense  
" Abso-bloody-lutely "
Meaning:
A more emphatic version of ’Absolutely’.
Example:
Would I like to borrow your new Maserati for a day? Abso-bloody-lutely I would!
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mainly in the UK.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" All to cock "
Meaning:
Ruined or shambolic.
Example:
I put in tablespoons instead of teaspoons and my cake recipe has gone all to cock.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. A variant of 'cocked up', which is of mid-20th century origin.
Where is it used?:
Predominantly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Alley cat "
Meaning:
1. A cat that lives wild in a town. 2. Slang term for a prostitute.
Example:
1. Those alley cats were screeching and chasing rats in the yard all night. 2. Jack's getting to be a sex addict. He spends all his time with bimbos and alley cats.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   sex   america  
" Ankle biter "
Meaning:
A slang term for small child.
Example:
Janice is pregnant again. With the twins still only two there's soon going to be three ankle biters around the place.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   childhood   america  
" Apples and pears "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for stairs.
Example:
Time for bed Jimmy - get yourself up the apples and pears.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   food   fruit  
" Away with the fairies "
Meaning:
Not facing reality; in a dream world.
Example:
She says she is going to star in Johnny Depp's next movie. If you ask me, she's away with the fairies.
Where did it originate?:
From the Celtic folk belief in fairies.
Where is it used?:
In Ireland, but also spreading to other countries.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   madness  
" Baby snatcher "
Meaning:
Someone who enters into an amorous relationship with a much younger person.
Example:
Jerry Lee Lewis never really recovered from being labelled a baby snatcher after he married his 13 year old cousin.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   euphemism  
" Barnet Fair "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for hair.
Example:
I'm not sure about that new hairdresser - he cut my barnet much too short.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   cockney_rhyming_slang   location  
" Bat from the pavilion end "
Meaning:
Slang term for a homosexuality.
Example:
If Julian didn't want us to know he was batting from the pavilion end he shouldn't keep wearing those lilac loafers.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century. An allusion to the game of cricket.
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More idioms about:   sport   location   sex   euphemism  
" Bitch slap "
Meaning:
An open-handed slap in the face intended to be humiliating.
Example:
He wasn't worth the respect of a punch. Bitch-slapping was more humiliating.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Widely used, but mainly amongst the young.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict   america  
" Blood blister "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sister.
Example:
There were five of us at home - three brothers and two blood blisters.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Blow a raspberry "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for fart.
Example:
Not good timing - we were sitting at the table when Granny said grace and he let go a raspberry.
Where did it originate?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   food   fruit  
" Boat race "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for face.
Example:
Stupid am I! Look into my boat and say that again!
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   sport   the_human_body  
" Bottle and glass "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for arse.
Example:
He slipped on those wet leaves by the gate. Legs in the air and landed on his bottle.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Brahms and Lizst "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pissed.
Example:
Two bottles of wine at home and then four pints in the pub - he was totally Brahms by ten-o-clock.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   drink   music  
" Brass monkey weather "
Meaning:
Extremely cold weather. The full expression is 'Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey'.
Example:
The weatherman says minus 10 degrees and strong winds for tomorrow. That's brass monkey weather.
Where did it originate?:
The UK and USA in the early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, mostly among people in their 20/40s, as a slang expression.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   weather  
" Brass tacks "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for facts.
Example:
I'm telling you brass tacks mate. Florida is bigger than England.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Bricks and mortar "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for daughter.
Example:
The girls got into trouble but her mother and I still love them - they are our bricks and mortars after all.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   family  
" Brighton Pier "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for queer (i.e. homosexual).
Example:
Quite appropriate that James lives with Julian in Brighton - they are Brighton Pier after all.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   location  
" Brown bread "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for dead.
Example:
That bird just landed on the live power cable. He's brown bread for sure.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   death   food  
" Caught by the short hairs (or short and curlies) "
Meaning:
Trapped by an opponent in a situation you can't escape.
Example:
I knew he had been stealing but he was the boss's son. If I said anything he would get me sacked - he had me by the short and curlies.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 19th century. People assume this expression has a vulgar origin but, in fact, when coined the hairs referred to were those on the back of the neck.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   hair   the_human_body  
" Chasing tail "
Meaning:
Of a man pursuing women.
Example:
Jack is a borderline sex addict. He's certainly always chasing the tail.
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More idioms about:   sex   euphemism  
" Cherry ripe "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pipe.
Example:
Get me twenty cigarettes while you are out would you? - and some tobacco for my cherry ripe.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   colour  
" China plate "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for mate.
Example:
We've been friends since school, haven't we my old china?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   household_items  
" Comfort women "
Meaning:
women forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese in WWII.
Example:
The Japanese called their prostitutes comfort women - nothing comfortable for them I think.
Where did it originate?:
WWII
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More idioms about:   sex   euphemism  
" Cream crackered "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for knackered. - note, when this term was coined, cream crackers were a popular snack in the UK.
Example:
That's an hour on the exercise bike. I can't do any more - I'm crackered.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   effort   food  
" Currant bun "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sun.
Example:
It's rained every day for ages. I can't remember the last time I saw the currant bun.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   weather   cockney_rhyming_slang   food  
" Daisy roots "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for boots.
Example:
I can't get them on. Either my feet have got bigger or these daisies have shrunk.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   cockney_rhyming_slang   clothes  
" Dicky Dirt "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for shirt.
Example:
Jane's wedding today. I'll need a newly pressed dickie dirt for that.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Dog and bone "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for telephone.
Example:
I need to talk to Jackie. Get her on the dog and bone for me would you?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Donkey's years "
Meaning:
1. Cockney rhyming slang for ears. 2. A very long time.
Example:
1. Prince Charles has a fine pair of donkeys. 2. This is the first school reunion we've had since 1982. I haven't seen some of these people in donkey's years.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   date   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Elephant's trunk "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for drunk.
Example:
He's been in the bar since we opened six hours ago. It's fair to assume that he's totally elephants by now.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   animals   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Evil twin "
Meaning:
An imaginary double, humorously referred to in order to explain the uncharacteristic bad behaviour of a normally moral person. Usually used light-heartedly. The expression formed as an allusion to plots in films involving actual evil twins.
Example:
Jane's such a good girl and I took it as read that she would come to the wedding dressed appropriately, but she's turned up in full goth makeup. At first I thought it must have been her evil twin.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 2004.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but mostly amongst the young and hip.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   america  
" Flea pit "
Meaning:
A downmarket cinema - allegedly verminous.
Example:
When we were kids we used to go to the local flea pit every saturday to watch B-movies.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   theatre   animals  
" Frog and toad "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for road.
Example:
Hurry up and move the car - I can see a traffic warden coming just down the frog and toad.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   travel  
" Funny farm "
Meaning:
A mental hospital.
Example:
Sadly, Jack was so psychotic they had to take him to the funny farm.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   building   medical   madness  
" Gender bender "
Meaning:
A person who adopts a deliberately androgynous appearance, by use of uni-sex make-up, hair-style and clothing. Probably influenced by 'bender' being an earlier slang term for homosexual.
Example:
With his eye-liner and lurex catsuits, David Bowie was the archetype gender bender.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1970s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   reduplication   america  
" George Raft "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for daft.
Example:
That handstand on the window ledge. You could say he was brave or you could say he was George Raft.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Ginger Beer "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for queer.
Example:
Julian is ginger - and I don't mean that he's got red hair.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   drink   colour   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Gnat's bollock "
Meaning:
A very small (imaginary) unit of measurement.
Example:
I was lucky to survive - the bullets were flying everywhere. One missed me by a gnat's bollock.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals  
" Go ape shit "
Meaning:
Become excessively agitated and excited.
Example:
John had been promised the job. He went ape shit when he found out it went to one of his subordinates.
Where did it originate?:
Originally USA (as 'go ape'). Britain, 1950s (as 'go ape shit'). Derived from the habit of apes of throwing faeces at adversaries when agitated.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not in polite company.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   excess  
" Greasy spoon "
Meaning:
A small cheap cafe selling fried food.
Example:
We had been driving all night. A fried breakfast in a greasy spoon was just what I fancied.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   household_items   america  
" Gregory Peck "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for neck.
Example:
It's freezing out there. Better get a scarf round your Gregory if you're going out.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Half inch "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pinch.
Example:
It's hopeless - whenever I try to start a DIY job I find that someone has half-inched some of my tools.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Have a Captain Cook "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for look.
Example:
Now madam, have a Captain Cook at these men and point out the one who attacked you.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Hobson's choice "
Meaning:
1. A choice forced upon someone. 2. Cockney rhyming slang for voice.
Example:
1. There was only one room left in the hotel when we arrived, so we got Hobson's choice. 2. I've had a sore throat for a couple of days - now I'm beginning to lose my hobsons.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. Derived from the name of the carrier Thomas Hobson.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although mostly amongst the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   name   cockney_rhyming_slang   euphemism  
" Holy shit! "
Meaning:
An expression of extreme surprise or disbelief.
Example:
Two lottery wins in our street in one week! Holy shit - that's next to impossible.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   surprise   america  
" In like Flynn "
Meaning:
To be easily successful, especially concerning sex or romance.
Example:
Since he had that lottery win and the nose job, he's in like Flynn with the girls.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1940s.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in the USA than elsewhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   name   america  
" It's all gone Pete Tong "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for gone wrong.
Example:
I thought I could make mayonnaise with butter. When I tried it all went Pete Tong.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, alluding to the popular DJ Pete Tong.
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Jack Palancing "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for dancing.
Example:
Julie wants me to go with her to the ballroom for a night of Jack Palancing.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   dance   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Jam jar "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for car.
Example:
Check my new Audi. Its the best jam jar I've ever owned.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel   food   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Jimmy Riddle "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for piddle.
Example:
Now kids, this is going to be a long car trip and we don't want to be stopping every five minutes. Just go and have a Jimmy before we set off.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Khyber pass "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for arse.
Example:
That was really insulting to my mother. When he bends over he's going to get a good kick up the khyber.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain. Note that the original pronunciation of 'pass' would have been 'parse', to rhyme with 'arse'. This reflects the 'long r' vocalisation of Cockneys. Current pronunciation depends on where you come from
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More idioms about:   location   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Kick the bucket "
Meaning:
Die.
Example:
Grandad kicked the bucket last week. No real surprise - he was 96.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   household_items   euphemism  
" Knee-trembler "
Meaning:
Sexual intercourse between two people standing up.
Example:
They had nowhere to go to make love and had to resort to a knee-trembler in the alley.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   sex  
" Loaf of bread "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for head.
Example:
Betting your wages on the toss of a coin isn't the best way to get out of debt - use your loaf mate.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   food   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Lord Fred "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for bed.
Example:
The hamster escaped and the cat got it - it's Lord Fred for sure.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Mince pies "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for eyes.
Example:
If that traffic warden comes back let me know - keep your minces open will you?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   body   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Mutt and Jeff "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for deaf.
Example:
You have to shout - he's almost completely mutton.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   body   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" My old Dutch "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for duchess.
Example:
This year will be our silver wedding, the old dutch and me.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   country   cockney_rhyming_slang   family  
" My old china "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for mate.
Example:
We've been best pals since schooldays. He's my best china plate.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   country   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Nip slip "
Meaning:
The inadvertent exposure of a womans nipple.
Example:
Wearing a low cut dress like that, a nip slip was almost inevitable.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA and UK and not amongst the older generations.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   clothes   body   reduplication   america  
" Nitty-gritty "
Meaning:
The important aspects of a situation; the heart of the matter.
Example:
The solicitor spent ages listing the business details of Grandad's will. We were all waiting for him to get to the nitty-gritty when we found out how much money we would inherit.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   reduplication   america  
" North and south "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for mouth.
Example:
No, it's true! I heard it straight from her own north and south.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   body  
" On your Tod "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for alone.
Example:
The others have all gone out - I'm on my tod.
Where did it originate?:
Origin uncertain - possibly related to the US jockey Tod Sloan.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Peachy keen "
Meaning:
Excellent; wonderful.
Example:
Wow, that 20-year old whiskey is peachy keen..
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   fruit   excellence   america  
" Pen and ink "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for stink.
Example:
That drain cover should be an airtight seal but it's broken. There's a real pen and ink in here.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Photo bomb "
Meaning:
Spoil a photograph by unexpectedly appearing in the picture and taking the attention away from the intended subject - usually as a prank.
Example:
Jack is so annoying. We were all posed for my graduation picture and he photobombed us wearing a pink cowboy hat.
Where did it originate?:
USA, early 21st century.
Where is it used?:
A recent derivation, not yet taken up by the older generations.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Plates of meat "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for feet.
Example:
I knew I shouldn't have agreed to help with the Christmas post. Ten miles up and down stairs today - my plates are killing me.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   the_human_body   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Porky pies "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for lies.
Example:
You can't trust what he tells you - half of his stories are porkies.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Potatoes (or taters) in the mould "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for cold.
Example:
Whoa, it's the coldest day of the winter so far - really taters.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   weather   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Rabbit and pork "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for talk.
Example:
He just goes on and on about his hobbies - rabbit, rabbit, rabbit!
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   animals   cockney_rhyming_slang   language  
" Rosie Lea "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for tea.
Example:
Put the kettle on would you? I'd love a nice cup of rosie lea.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Ruby Murray "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for curry.
Example:
Every Friday night after work, the lads all pile into the Star of India for a ruby.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Sad ass "
Meaning:
A reference to an inept or undesirable person or thing.
Example:
Since the coal mines and steelworks have closed many places in the Rust Belt have become real sad-ass towns.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mainly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   failure   america  
" Scarper Flow "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for go.
Example:
The police are on there way. With your record they are bound to think the fight was your fault - you'd better scarper before they get here.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Sexton Blake "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for fake.
Example:
That picture was supposed to be by Monet but there was a mobile phone in the background - I knew right away it was a sexton.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Sparrow fart "
Meaning:
Jokey term for the early morning.
Example:
I know we have to get the early flight but isn't 2am too soon to be getting up? It isn't even sparrow fart yet.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century. Originally an example of rural slang.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   time  
" Syrup of figs "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for wig.
Example:
That thatch on Donald Trump's head - it has to be a syrup.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   cockney_rhyming_slang   hair  
" Take a butchers "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for look.
Example:
There's a triple rainbow over there. If you don't believe me take a butchers yourself.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Tea leaf "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for thief.
Example:
Just be careful to keep your purse safe when you go down to the market - there are plenty of tea leaves ready to steal it.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   crime   drink   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" That sucks "
Meaning:
1. An expression of sympathy. 2. Said of something that the speaker rates very lowly.
Example:
1. I heard that your child has leukaemia. That sucks - I'm so sorry. 2. His singing is out of tune and he just can't dance. The whole performance sucks.
Where did it originate?:
USA
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA, bit spreading Worldwide in recent years.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   disgust   sympathy   america  
" The tail wagging the dog "
Meaning:
A small and usually insignificant factor (or person) dominates over one that is normally more powerful and influential.
Example:
Even small countries like Estonia have a veto in European Union voting and can't be over-ruled. I'd call that the tail wagging the dog.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1870s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   america  
" The town bike "
Meaning:
Promiscuous woman.
Example:
She's been with every boy in the neighbourhood - they even call her the town bike.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex  
" Titfer tat "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for hat.
Example:
It looks like rain - I think I'll need a coat and my titfer.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Trouble and strife "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for wife.
Example:
Twenty years we've been married now, the trouble and strife and myself.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   cockney_rhyming_slang   conflict  
" Two and eight "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for state.
Example:
His clothes were awry and he'd lost one of his shoes - he was in a right two and eight.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Uncle Dick "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sick.
Example:
Sorry, I won't be into work today. I'll feeling Uncle Dick.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   medical   family   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Up shit creek without a paddle "
Meaning:
In serious difficulty, with no hope of respite.
Example:
We were halfway across the Australian outback when we realised our water bottle had leaked. We really were up shit creek.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1890s. Note: Shit creek isn't a real place.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   misfortune   america  
" Use your loaf "
Meaning:
Think smart.
Example:
Sending money to that Nigerian email scam. Use your loaf, mate - wasn't it obvious it was a con?
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most commonly in Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   the_human_body   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Veg out "
Meaning:
Relax in a slothful manner, usually watching tv while lying on a sofa - (that is, become a 'couch-potato').
Example:
Such a stressful time at work this week. Come Friday night all I was good for was to veg out binge watching Friends.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most commonly restricted to the under 40s.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   relaxation   food  
" Wardrobe malfunction "
Meaning:
Referring to an item of clothing slipping out of place to expose part of the body.
Example:
Her top slipped down in front of the boys. She said it was a wardrobe malfunction but I think it was deliberate.
Where did it originate?:
USA. First said by Justin Timberlake to explain the inadvertent exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the half-time show at the 2004 Super Bowl.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes   household_items   america  
" Whistle and flute "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for suit.
Example:
That important interview is coming up next week. I think I ought to get a new whistle.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Would you Adam and Eve it? "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for would you believe it?
Example:
Amazing - he hit double top six times with six darts. Would you Adam and Eve it?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  

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