Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"shakespeare" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word shakespeare

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word shakespeare

" A fool’s paradise "
Meaning:
A state of euphoria with no basis in reality.
Example:
He thinks he is going to get the top job but there’s no chance of that. He’s just living in a fool’s paradise.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity  
" Method to my madness "
Meaning:
Odd actions that appear meaningless but are done for a good reason.
Example:
Mixing cooking oil with the petrol might seem a little odd, but just wait, you'll see there's method in my madness.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. From Shakespeare's Hamlet, as 'though this is madness, yet there is method in it'.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity  
" Salad days "
Meaning:
The days of one's youthful inexperience and enthusiasm.
Example:
I'm too old and cynical to believe politician's promises now. I'm well past my salad days.
Where did it originate?:
Shakespeare
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   date   food  

 We are also on Facebook

 Copyright Gary Martin, 2019