Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"patience" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word patience

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word patience

" About time "
Meaning:
1. Almost time. 2. High time.
Example:
1. Hurry up, it’s about time for the game to start. 2. These running shoes are worn through. It’s about time I got a new pair.
Where did it originate?:
1. and 2., both British.
Where is it used?:
Both meanings widely used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clock  
" Bite your tongue "
Meaning:
Avoid speaking.
Example:
I knew his wife wasn't faithful but I didn't like to say - I thought it best to bite my tongue.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. Early (pre 1000AD) English, in the form of hold or keep one's tongue.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   language  
" Cross that bridge when you come to it "
Meaning:
Deal with a problem if and when it becomes necessary, not before.
Example:
My pension might not be enough to live on when I'm retired, but I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location   cliche  
" Don't count your chickens before they hatch "
Meaning:
Don't count on receiving some benefit until you actually have it.
Example:
I know you felt good about that exam, but you haven't passed until you get the result - don't count your chickens.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century proverb.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   luck   animals   proverbial  
" Haste makes waste "
Meaning:
Doing things in a rush makes for a poor result.
Example:
I should have known I would trip if I ran with that tray of drinks - haste makes waste.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century proverb.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   work  
" Hold your horses "
Meaning:
Be patient.
Example:
I know you want to get off home but hold your horses, there's another ten minutes before the school bell is due.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   america  
" Practice makes perfect "
Meaning:
Diligent practice leads to expertise.
Example:
10,000 hours needed to make a top class pianist. Keep going - practice makes perfect.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century proverb.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cliche  
" Sit tight "
Meaning:
Wait and take do nothing until the time is right for action.
Example:
I know you hoped to be promoted by now. Don't worry though. It will happen; just sit tight, do your job well and wait.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century. Probably an allusion to birds sitting quiet and still when threatened by a predator.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:

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