Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"music" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word music

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word music

" All together now "
Meaning:
Invitation to join in communal singing.
Example:
Come on all of you, let's have a sing-song. I'll count you in - all together now.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Brahms and Lizst "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pissed.
Example:
Two bottles of wine at home and then four pints in the pub - he was totally Brahms by ten-o-clock.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   drink   slang  
" Elvis has left the building "
Meaning:
The primary performer has left. There's no point waiting around.
Example:
Go away. We're closed. It's all over. Nothing to see here. Elvis has left the building. Do I need to go on?
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in the USA than elsewhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   building   name   america  
" Face the music "
Meaning:
Accept he unwelcome consequences of one's own actions.
Example:
Jack pretended he had a Ph.D. to get the job. Now it's come out that he hasn't he'll have to face the music and resign..
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Perfect pitch "
Meaning:
The ability to determine a musical note by ear.
Example:
He knew that the cars engine was humming a D sharp just by listening - he has perfect pitch.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1920s. Deriving from the earlier 'absolute pitch', which is known from the 1880s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   excellence  
" Van Gogh's ear for music "
Meaning:
Tone deaf.
Example:
I'd love to join the choir but my audition was a disaster. The conductor said I had Van Gogh's ear for music.
Where did it originate?:
An ironic joke alluding to Van Gogh's celebrated loss of his ear, coined in Britain in the late 20th century. The source idiom 'ear for music' has been used in Britain since the 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain and not a common idiom.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   name   hyperbole  

 We are also on Facebook

 Copyright Gary Martin, 2019