Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"misfortune" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word misfortune

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word misfortune

" A bad break "
Meaning:
1. A misfortune. 2. A serious bone fracture.
Example:
1. Tony has lost his job, just when he needed the cash to move house. That’s a bad break. 2. Tanya’s leg was crushed when the rock fell on it - a really bad break the doctor said.
Where did it originate?:
1. USA 2. UK.
Where is it used?:
1. USA. 2. Widely used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   medical  
" A bad hair day "
Meaning:
A day on which everything seems to go wrong.
Example:
I missed the bus and was late on the one day the boss was early and now I’ve laddered my tights! - talk about a bad hair day.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Predominantly in the USA but also more widely.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   hair   emotion   america  
" Bag lady "
Meaning:
A homeless woman, who carries all her possessions in shopping bags.
Example:
It's a shame about Edith. She had a home and family this time last year and now she's divorced and living on the streets as a bag lady.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1970s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Basket case "
Meaning:
A person or thing that is no longer able to function effectively, either through disability or misfortune.
Example:
The Greek economy took a nosedive after the 2008 world financial meltdown - to the point of becoming a total economic basket case.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america   medical  
" Queer street "
Meaning:
The imaginary location of people who have major problems in their life, especially debt. (Note: not a real place, nor connected to homosexuality)
Example:
The business has gone into liquidation, my wife has left and the mortgage company want the house. I'm really in queer street.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location  
" The author of your own misfortune "
Meaning:
Be to blame for one's own problems.
Example:
Tommy just took off across the moors with no gear and no phone. He ended up in hospital but no one is too sorry for him - he was the author of his own misfortune.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but rather old-fashioned.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   failure  
" Unlucky in love "
Meaning:
Having been unable to find a long-term romantic partner.
Example:
Jane's so unlucky in love. That's the third time she's been engaged only to have it broken off.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion   family  
" Up shit creek without a paddle "
Meaning:
In serious difficulty, with no hope of respite.
Example:
We were halfway across the Australian outback when we realised our water bottle had leaked. We really were up shit creek.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1890s. Note: Shit creek isn't a real place.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   slang   america  
" Ups a daisy "
Meaning:
A saying, usually to a child, after a stumble or fall, to encourage them to get up. (ups is a variant of whoops).
Example:
Ooh, Tommy the toddler, fallen over again have you? Never mind - ups a daisy and let's try again.
Where did it originate?:
America, 20th century. The expression sounds old and English, but it isn't.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but considered dated and coy by many.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   childhood  

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