Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"madness" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word madness

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word madness

" Away with the fairies "
Meaning:
Not facing reality; in a dream world.
Example:
She says she is going to star in Johnny Depp's next movie. If you ask me, she's away with the fairies.
Where did it originate?:
From the Celtic folk belief in fairies.
Where is it used?:
In Ireland, but also spreading to other countries.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   slang  
" Cloud cuckoo-land "
Meaning:
An imaginary idealistic state where everything is perfect. It is usually used with reference to someone who has an overly optimistic and unrealistic belief.
Example:
If you think you can get a managerial job without any qualifications or experience you are living in cloud cuckoo-land.
Where did it originate?:
'Cloud cuckoo-land' derives from a comment made by was coined by the 4th century BC Greek playwright Aristophanes in the whimsical and extravagant play The Birds. First used in English in the 1820s, in the United Kingdom.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   travel   greek_origin  
" Funny farm "
Meaning:
A mental hospital.
Example:
Sadly, Jack was so psychotic they had to take him to the funny farm.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   building   medical   slang  
" Like a chicken with its head cut off "
Meaning:
In a frenzied manner.
Example:
He was shouting and swearing because they had lost the contract - he was running around like a chicken with its head cut off.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not particularly common.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion   animals   excess   hyperbole   america  
" Method to my madness "
Meaning:
Odd actions that appear meaningless but are done for a good reason.
Example:
Mixing cooking oil with the petrol might seem a little odd, but just wait, you'll see there's method in my madness.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. From Shakespeare's Hamlet, as 'though this is madness, yet there is method in it'.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity   shakespeare  
" Not playing with a full deck "
Meaning:
Someone who lacks intelligence.
Example:
I asked him to meet me in Derby and he went to Denby. Sometimes I don't think he's playing with a full deck.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in Britain than elsewhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity  

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