Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"hyperbole" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word hyperbole

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word hyperbole

" A fate worse than death "
Meaning:
The reputed opinion of sexual intercourse by prim Victorian ladies.
Example:
Lord Carruthers dragged me to his bedroom and left me in no doubt I was to suffer a fate worse than death.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but now considered rather old-fashioned and used mainly by the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   death   euphemism  
" A knight in shining armour "
Meaning:
A person who comes to the aid of another when other hopes have faded, like the knights in romantic stories.
Example:
She was stuck, out of petrol in the middle of the moors at night. When the repair man turned up she called him her knight in shining armour.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. An allusion to the notion of gallant and noble mediaeval knights.
Where is it used?:
Widespread but not commonly used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Foam at the mouth "
Meaning:
To show vehement rage.
Example:
He was mad as hell - really foaming at the mouth.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Going to hell in a handbasket "
Meaning:
Deteriorating and headed for complete disaster.
Example:
When the British went over the top at the Somme the soldiers didn't realise they were headed for hell in a handbasket.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   religion   household_items   america  
" Like a chicken with its head cut off "
Meaning:
In a frenzied manner.
Example:
He was shouting and swearing because they had lost the contract - he was running around like a chicken with its head cut off.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not particularly common.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion   animals   excess   madness   america  
" New York minute "
Meaning:
A short space of time.
Example:
I know we need to leave soon, but I can get ready really quickly. I'll be with you in a New York minute.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location   time   america  
" Over my dead body "
Meaning:
Said when you absolutely refuse to allow something to happen.
Example:
He bullied me at school and now you want to promote him. Over my dead body!
Where did it originate?:
Britain, circa 1800. From the writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   conflict   the_human_body  
" Shoot down in flames "
Meaning:
Destroy an argument or theory.
Example:
They sent their perpetual motion ideas to the Royal Society. Of course, it was all nonsense and they were shot down in flames.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1940s. An allusion to fighter planes being shot down.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although rather old-fashioned.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict  
" Van Gogh's ear for music "
Meaning:
Tone deaf.
Example:
I'd love to join the choir but my audition was a disaster. The conductor said I had Van Gogh's ear for music.
Where did it originate?:
An ironic joke alluding to Van Gogh's celebrated loss of his ear, coined in Britain in the late 20th century. The source idiom 'ear for music' has been used in Britain since the 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain and not a common idiom.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   name   music  

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