Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"happiness" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word happiness

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word happiness

" A blessing in disguise "
Meaning:
An apparent misfortune that works to the eventual benefit of the recipient.
Example:
Breaking my arm was a blessing in disguise. I married the nurse.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   luck  
" A place in the sun "
Meaning:
An idealistic dream of a sunny hideaway.
Example:
We’ve been lucky, we managed to buy ourselves a place in the sun for our retirement.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century. An allusion to a literal pleasant retirement location.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, not not common.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location  
" A sight for sore eyes "
Meaning:
A welcome sight that you weren’t expecting.
Example:
Wow. You’re a sight for sore eyes. They told me you were abroad and would miss my wedding.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" As high as a kite "
Meaning:
1. Very high up in the sky. 2. High on drugs or excitement.
Example:
1. The Petronas Tower is as high as a kite. 2. She was ecstatic that she won the gold medal. She was high as a kite afterwards.
Where did it originate?:
1. Britain - 17th century. It probably refers to Red Kites, birds that were common in the UK in the 17th century, rather than children's kites. 2. USA.
Where is it used?:
1. In the UK. 2. Worldwide.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   medical   cliche   animals   america  
" Happy sad "
Meaning:
A bittersweet feeling combining both happiness and sadness.
Example:
Dad won the Bafta for best actor but was too ill to collect it, so I'm happy sad about that.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not commonly used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion  
" Head over heels "
Meaning:
Very excited, especially when in love.
Example:
She said yes! We are to be married and I'm head over heels.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion   the_human_body   excess  
" Many happy returns "
Meaning:
A toast given to someone on their birthday.
Example:
The old fella is 80 today - many happy returns Grandad.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide. This idiom has to have a claim for being spoken by more people more frequently than any other in the language.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   date  
" On cloud nine "
Meaning:
Blissfully happy.
Example:
The day after George proposed to her, Mildred won the lottery. She's on cloud nine.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   weather   america  
" Quality time "
Meaning:
Time spent with a child, spouse or friend in an uninterrupted and attentive way.
Example:
I've been working 12 hours a day this week and haven't been home once for the toddler's bedtime. This weekend I'm going to give them some quality time and take them to the zoo
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   america  
" Red letter day "
Meaning:
A significant, important or happy day.
Example:
Mom will be a hundred years old on the 23rd. That's a real red-letter day for the family.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 15th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   colour   date  

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