Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"hair" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word hair

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word hair

" A bad hair day "
Meaning:
A day on which everything seems to go wrong.
Example:
I missed the bus and was late on the one day the boss was early and now I’ve laddered my tights! - talk about a bad hair day.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Predominantly in the USA but also more widely.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   emotion   misfortune   america  
" Caught by the short hairs (or short and curlies) "
Meaning:
Trapped by an opponent in a situation you can't escape.
Example:
I knew he had been stealing but he was the boss's son. If I said anything he would get me sacked - he had me by the short and curlies.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 19th century. People assume this expression has a vulgar origin but, in fact, when coined the hairs referred to were those on the back of the neck.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   slang  
" Hair of the dog "
Meaning:
An alcoholic drink, intended to cure a hangover. It is mistakenly believed that a small measure of the same drink that made a person drunk will sober them up and cure the drinks ill effects. The expression is also used in other contexts, whenever an additional dose of whatever caused a problem is thought to be an appropriate remedy.
Example:
I feel rough. I shouldn't have had those last six tequila slammers last night. Here goes another - maybe it will be the hair of the dog.
Where did it originate?:
England, 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   animals   medical  
" Let your hair down "
Meaning:
Behave in a free an uninhibited manner. Usually applied to women.
Example:
Its Sharon's hen party tonight - the girls are really going to let their hair down.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   excess  
" Syrup of figs "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for wig.
Example:
That thatch on Donald Trump's head - it has to be a syrup.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" The empty chair "
Meaning:
The perceived absense of someone who is recently deceased.
Example:
Some days I can forget about Jim's death for a while, then I see the empty chair and the grief comes back.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   household_items  

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