Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"emotion" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word emotion

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word emotion

" A bad hair day "
Meaning:
A day on which everything seems to go wrong.
Example:
I missed the bus and was late on the one day the boss was early and now I’ve laddered my tights! - talk about a bad hair day.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Predominantly in the USA but also more widely.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   hair   misfortune   america  
" A chip on your shoulder "
Meaning:
A sense of inferiority characterized by a quickness to take offence.
Example:
He’s the only cabinet minister that didn’t go to Eton and it’s given him a bit of a chip on his shoulder.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   america  
" Absence makes the heart grow fonder "
Meaning:
Our feelings for people and things grows when we are apart from them.
Example:
I enjoyed visiting Italy but after a few weeks I couldn’t wait to get home to my wife. As they say - absense makes the heart grow fonder.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Still used, predominantly in the UK, mostly by the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   adage  
" Add insult to injury "
Meaning:
To further a loss. To make a bad situation worse.
Example:
She jilted him at the altar, but to add insult to injury, she later married his brother.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   excess  
" Amped up "
Meaning:
Excited and ready for action.
Example:
He's been training for today all year. Now the big day has come and he's amped up and ready to go.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century. A reference to the amplification of acoustic instruments.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more in the USA than elsewhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Dial down "
Meaning:
1. Adjust a device to reduce sound or temperature. 2. Reduce one's emotional reaction to something.
Example:
1. It's boiling in here. Just dial down the thermostat would you? 2. Okay, so your favourite didn't win X-Factor. No need to bite the carpet - just dial it down a notch.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Fairytale ending "
Meaning:
A happy simplistic ending to a story similar to those found in fairy tales.
Example:
Disney stories are great for kids, but their fairytale endings don't match real life for adults.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 19th century. Used in a magazine article by Charles Dickens.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Fire the imagination "
Meaning:
Inspire with enthusiasm.
Example:
I didn't agree with Billy Graham's views but his fervent delivery really fired the imagination of those who did.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   excess  
" Get over it "
Meaning:
Move beyond something that is bothering you.
Example:
Okay she left him, but that was two years ago. He needs to get over it and move on.
Where is it used?:
" Gut feeling "
Meaning:
A personal intuition, based on feeling rather than fact.
Example:
Even before the trial, I always had a gut feeling that O J Simpson was a wrong un.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Happy sad "
Meaning:
A bittersweet feeling combining both happiness and sadness.
Example:
Dad won the Bafta for best actor but was too ill to collect it, so I'm happy sad about that.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not commonly used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   happiness  
" He makes my flesh (or skin) crawl (or creep) "
Meaning:
Said of someone who the speaker has a deep dislike of.
Example:
Savile was a sexual predator for 50 years. Just seeing a picture of his stupid face now makes my skin crawl.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 15th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   disgust  
" Head over heels "
Meaning:
Very excited, especially when in love.
Example:
She said yes! We are to be married and I'm head over heels.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   excess   happiness  
" I can't be doing with it "
Meaning:
I am unwilling to tolerate it.
Example:
Next door are having another party and the noise is outrageous - I'm going round there to tell them I can't be doing with it.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" I can't think straight "
Meaning:
I'm overwhelmed and stressed and it is affecting my ability to think.
Example:
The kids' party got a little out of hand and I had to go outside to get some work done. I couldn't think straight with all that yelling and running around.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Keep your chin up "
Meaning:
Remain positive in a tough situation.
Example:
Sorry to hear that you were made redundant on the day your buried your mother. Keep your chin up mate.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Although derived in the USA this idiom is more commonly heard now in Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   the_human_body   proverbial   america  
" Like a chicken with its head cut off "
Meaning:
In a frenzied manner.
Example:
He was shouting and swearing because they had lost the contract - he was running around like a chicken with its head cut off.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not particularly common.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   excess   hyperbole   madness   america  
" Lose your head "
Meaning:
Overcome by emotion and out of control.
Example:
When the traffic warden had his car towed, Jack lost his head and hit him.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   body   excess  
" Off the hook "
Meaning:
No longer having to deal with something.
Example:
I know it's your turn to organise the Christmas party but you're off the hook, Judy volunteered to take over.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century - in the writings of Anthony Trollope
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" That Friday feeling "
Meaning:
Anticipation of the weekend after a hard working week.
Example:
I'm ready for a few jars at the pub after work - I've got that friday feeling.
Where did it originate?:
20th century origin, although the similar 'Friday face' is known in England since the 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   date   work  
" Unlucky in love "
Meaning:
Having been unable to find a long-term romantic partner.
Example:
Jane's so unlucky in love. That's the third time she's been engaged only to have it broken off.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   misfortune   family  
" Water under the bridge "
Meaning:
A past experience that you prefer not to affect your current life.
Example:
Losing my wife and my job was difficult at the time but I've moved on. Its all water under the bridge now.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature  

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