Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"education" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word education

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word education

" Ivy league "
Meaning:
The joint name given to Columbia, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Yale, Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Harvard universities.
Example:
He had a good start to his academic career. He was an ivy leaguer.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1930s.
Where is it used?:
USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Know the ropes "
Meaning:
To understand how to do something.
Example:
I'm being supervised by Jim for now, but as soon as I know the ropes I'll be working on my own.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century. Possibly of nautical origin.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   work   cliche  
" You can't teach an old dog new tricks "
Meaning:
Once animals (and people) are set in their ways they struggle to assimilate new ideas.
Example:
I tried to learn Mandarin after I retired but I got nowhere with it. I guess you can't teach an old dog new tricks.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century proverb. One of the oldest proverbs in English.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but like many proverbs, now mostly used by the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   proverbial  

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