Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"drink" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word drink

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word drink

" Amber nectar "
Meaning:
A slang term for lager.
Example:
I've been in the outback all day rounding up sheep and my throat's as dry as a pommies towel. I'm just about ready to sink a few tinnies of the amber nectar.
Where did it originate?:
Originally the USA but only becoming widely used following its use as an advertising slogan by Foster's Lager, initially in Australia.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but rarely by the over 60s.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   colour   australian_origin  
" Brahms and Lizst "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pissed.
Example:
Two bottles of wine at home and then four pints in the pub - he was totally Brahms by ten-o-clock.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   slang   music  
" Designated driver "
Meaning:
Someone who agrees not to drink alcohol at a social event in order to be sober enough to drive others home.
Example:
It really wasn't my turn to be designated driver this week but I was late arriving and by the time I got there all the others were already drunk.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1980s
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel   america  
" Don't cry over spilt milk "
Meaning:
Don't fret pointlessly about some mistake or loss when it can't be remedied.
Example:
Well, the vase is smashed. There's no point crying over spilt milk.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century proverb.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   cliche   proverbial  
" Drink like a fish "
Meaning:
Drink very heavily.
Example:
Dean Martin drank like a fish.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   food   animals  
" Elephant's trunk "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for drunk.
Example:
He's been in the bar since we opened six hours ago. It's fair to assume that he's totally elephants by now.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Ginger Beer "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for queer.
Example:
Julian is ginger - and I don't mean that he's got red hair.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   colour   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Hair of the dog "
Meaning:
An alcoholic drink, intended to cure a hangover. It is mistakenly believed that a small measure of the same drink that made a person drunk will sober them up and cure the drinks ill effects. The expression is also used in other contexts, whenever an additional dose of whatever caused a problem is thought to be an appropriate remedy.
Example:
I feel rough. I shouldn't have had those last six tequila slammers last night. Here goes another - maybe it will be the hair of the dog.
Where did it originate?:
England, 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   medical  
" Liquor up "
Meaning:
To supply or to drink alcoholic drink.
Example:
They decided to get liquored up in the pub, even before they got to the party.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century (to supply liquor). USA, 19th century (to drink liquor).
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but not commonly used everywhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   america  
" Rosie Lea "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for tea.
Example:
Put the kettle on would you? I'd love a nice cup of rosie lea.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Tea leaf "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for thief.
Example:
Just be careful to keep your purse safe when you go down to the market - there are plenty of tea leaves ready to steal it.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   crime   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Wine and dine "
Meaning:
Entertain in a high class restaurant.
Example:
We won an all-expenses paid trip to Paris. We were wined and dined every night for free.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   food  
" Worse for wear "
Meaning:
Either 1. Shabby and worn out, or 2. Drunk.
Example:
1. This winter coat is a few years old now and is starting to look a bit worse for wear. 2. I know it's Jack's leaving do and he wants to stay until the end but, after all those tequia slammers, he's begining to look a little worse for wear.
Where did it originate?:
1. Britain, 16th century. 2. Britain 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Both forms used Worldwide, although 2 is more common in Britain than elsewhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   failure  
" You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink "
Meaning:
You can encourage someone to to do something but, in the end, what they do is their own choice.
Example:
I bought her a car; I even paid for the driving lessons, but she still travels everywhere by bus.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 12th century. One of the oldest proverbs in the English language
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   proverbial  

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