Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"date" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word date

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word date

" Act your age "
Meaning:
Behave in a manner appropriate to your stage in life.
Example:
Grandad is doing his jazz dancing again. So embarrassing. I wish he’d act his age.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Between the wars "
Meaning:
The period between WWI and WWII.
Example:
My parents were married in 1930. I'm not really a war baby, more a between the wars baby.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Calendar year "
Meaning:
Twelve months beginning from the first of January.
Example:
The tax report shows our earnings for a full calendar year.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Carpe diem "
Meaning:
Latin expression meaning seize the day.
Example:
Rise and shine kids. The sun is shining. Carpe diem!
Where did it originate?:
Latin
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   latin  
" Daily grind "
Meaning:
The dull daily routine.
Example:
Monday morning again - time to get to work and start the daily grind.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   work  
" Date rape "
Meaning:
The rape by a man of his partner on a date.
Example:
There's been so many stories of date rape in the news lately that Suzy arranged to meet her date in a busy pub.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century. Previously referred to as 'acquaintance rape'.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   crime   america  
" Day surgery "
Meaning:
Minor surgery that does not require the patient to stay in hospital overnight.
Example:
I've got to have a gallstone op - luckily it doesn't take long. It will be a day-surgery job.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   medical  
" Daylight saving time "
Meaning:
The adjustment of clocks to provide longer evening daylight.
Example:
I can never work out if Daylight Saving Time gives me an hour more in bed or an hour less.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain but has also been taken up by other countries that adjust the clocks seasonally.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   time  
" Donkey's years "
Meaning:
1. Cockney rhyming slang for ears. 2. A very long time.
Example:
1. Prince Charles has a fine pair of donkeys. 2. This is the first school reunion we've had since 1982. I haven't seen some of these people in donkey's years.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Duvet day "
Meaning:
A work day which an employee is allowed to spend at home relaxing.
Example:
We'd all worked so hard getting the latest design out on time the boss rewarded us with a duvet day to do whatever we wanted.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1990s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   work   household_items   relaxation  
" First footing "
Meaning:
Making a round of visits at New Year.
Example:
As soon as the clock strikes midnight on 31st December we'll be off around town first footing all our neighbours.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, especially Scotland, from 19th century onward.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Scotland but has travelled with Scots throughout the world.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   the_human_body  
" High season "
Meaning:
The most popular time to visit a resort or attraction - when prices are highest.
Example:
It's way too busy here to get a deckchair on the beach. I suppose that's what we should have expected when we booked a holiday in high season.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel  
" Many happy returns "
Meaning:
A toast given to someone on their birthday.
Example:
The old fella is 80 today - many happy returns Grandad.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide. This idiom has to have a claim for being spoken by more people more frequently than any other in the language.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   happiness  
" No spring chicken "
Meaning:
Said of people who are no longer young but may behave as though they were.
Example:
Dad's marrying again, to a woman in her 60s. Mind you, he's no spring chicken either.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century. Young chickens are considered more tasty to eat than those slaughtered later in the year.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   america  
" Red letter day "
Meaning:
A significant, important or happy day.
Example:
Mom will be a hundred years old on the 23rd. That's a real red-letter day for the family.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 15th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   colour   happiness  
" Salad days "
Meaning:
The days of one's youthful inexperience and enthusiasm.
Example:
I'm too old and cynical to believe politician's promises now. I'm well past my salad days.
Where did it originate?:
Shakespeare
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   shakespeare  
" That Friday feeling "
Meaning:
Anticipation of the weekend after a hard working week.
Example:
I'm ready for a few jars at the pub after work - I've got that friday feeling.
Where did it originate?:
20th century origin, although the similar 'Friday face' is known in England since the 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion   work  
" The glorious twelfth "
Meaning:
The 12th of August - the start of the British grouse shooting season.
Example:
Just two weeks to go. I've booked all the beaters and the trip to the grouse moor is all set - bring on the glorious twelfth.
Where is it used?:
Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   number   excellence  
" Winter drawers on "
Meaning:
British euphemistic joke.
Example:
Autumn is over and these summer clothes aren't keeping the cold out - winter drawers on I suppose.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century. A pun on the expression 'winter draws on' (that is, winter is approaching). 'Drawers' is a British slang term for knickers.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   weather   clothes   euphemism  

 We are also on Facebook

 Copyright Gary Martin, 2019