Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"dance" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word dance

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word dance

" Bust a move "
Meaning:
Dance in a stylish way.
Example:
That new cheerleader is amazing - she's really busting some moves.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, amongst younger generations.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" It takes two to tango "
Meaning:
It takes two people to cause a problem between them.
Example:
Maybe Jack did provoke the argument but he couldn't argue on his own could he? - it takes two to tango.
Where did it originate?:
USA, from a popular 1952 song of the same name.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   adage   america  
" Jack Palancing "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for dancing.
Example:
Julie wants me to go with her to the ballroom for a night of Jack Palancing.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Partner up "
Meaning:
Find a companion.
Example:
Okay, this next dance is the waltz. If everyone partners up we can get started.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although not commonly used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" The heebie-jeebies "
Meaning:
A state of nervous anxiety or fear.
Example:
I didn't like staying in that old house overnight. The creaks and bumps gave me the heebie-jeebies.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century. The origin isn't known but heebie-jeebie was formerly the name of a dance.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   medical   reduplication   america  

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