Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"crime" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word crime

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word crime

" A diamond in the rough (a.k.a rough diamond ) "
Meaning:
A person or thing having good underlying qualities while appearing to be coarse and unpolished.
Example:
He’d been in jail several times for fraud but when he found my lost wallet he returned it. A rough diamond if there ever was one.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Date rape "
Meaning:
The rape by a man of his partner on a date.
Example:
There's been so many stories of date rape in the news lately that Suzy arranged to meet her date in a busy pub.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century. Previously referred to as 'acquaintance rape'.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   america  
" Fell off the back of a lorry "
Meaning:
A coy reference to an item that has been stolen.
Example:
That iPad I just bought in the pub was really cheap. Best not to ask me where it came from. Let's just say it fell off the back of a lorry.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid/late 20th century. The USA has a 'fell off the back of a truck' variant.
Where is it used?:
Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   vehicle  
" In cahoots with "
Meaning:
To be in a partnership with, often for unscrupulous purposes.
Example:
I saw the pickpocket give Jack the watch he'd stolen. Jack later claimed that he didn't know him but it seems obvious that they were in cahoots.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Inside job "
Meaning:
A crime committed by or with the help of someone living or working in the place that it took place.
Example:
Only the staff in the security department knew the safe's combination and it wasn't forced open. It had to be an inside job.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" No saint "
Meaning:
Someone who might claim to be of good behaviour but has in fact a sordid past.
Example:
She was critical of those girls in short skirts but she's no saint herself I can tell you.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   religion  
" Tea leaf "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for thief.
Example:
Just be careful to keep your purse safe when you go down to the market - there are plenty of tea leaves ready to steal it.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   cockney_rhyming_slang  

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