Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"cockney rhyming slang" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word cockney rhyming slang

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word cockney rhyming slang

" A bull and cow "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for a row or argument.
Example:
They were shouting and screaming at each other - a real bull and cow.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly in the UK, but occasionally elsewhere too.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict   animals  
" A load of cobblers "
Meaning:
Nonsense.
Example:
He says he has invented a perpetual motion machine, which is clearly a load of cobblers.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used, especially in the UK. Slang and borderline swearing - not one for your Grandma.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity   nonsense  
" Apples and pears "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for stairs.
Example:
Time for bed Jimmy - get yourself up the apples and pears.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   fruit  
" Barnet Fair "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for hair.
Example:
I'm not sure about that new hairdresser - he cut my barnet much too short.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   location  
" Blood blister "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sister.
Example:
There were five of us at home - three brothers and two blood blisters.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family  
" Blow a raspberry "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for fart.
Example:
Not good timing - we were sitting at the table when Granny said grace and he let go a raspberry.
Where did it originate?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   fruit  
" Boat race "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for face.
Example:
Stupid am I! Look into my boat and say that again!
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sport   the_human_body  
" Bottle and glass "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for arse.
Example:
He slipped on those wet leaves by the gate. Legs in the air and landed on his bottle.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Brahms and Lizst "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pissed.
Example:
Two bottles of wine at home and then four pints in the pub - he was totally Brahms by ten-o-clock.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   slang   music  
" Brass tacks "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for facts.
Example:
I'm telling you brass tacks mate. Florida is bigger than England.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Bricks and mortar "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for daughter.
Example:
The girls got into trouble but her mother and I still love them - they are our bricks and mortars after all.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family  
" Brighton Pier "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for queer (i.e. homosexual).
Example:
Quite appropriate that James lives with Julian in Brighton - they are Brighton Pier after all.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location  
" Brown bread "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for dead.
Example:
That bird just landed on the live power cable. He's brown bread for sure.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   food  
" Cherry ripe "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pipe.
Example:
Get me twenty cigarettes while you are out would you? - and some tobacco for my cherry ripe.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   colour  
" China plate "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for mate.
Example:
We've been friends since school, haven't we my old china?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   household_items  
" Cream crackered "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for knackered. - note, when this term was coined, cream crackers were a popular snack in the UK.
Example:
That's an hour on the exercise bike. I can't do any more - I'm crackered.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   food  
" Currant bun "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sun.
Example:
It's rained every day for ages. I can't remember the last time I saw the currant bun.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   weather   food  
" Daisy roots "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for boots.
Example:
I can't get them on. Either my feet have got bigger or these daisies have shrunk.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   clothes  
" Dicky Dirt "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for shirt.
Example:
Jane's wedding today. I'll need a newly pressed dickie dirt for that.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes   name  
" Dog and bone "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for telephone.
Example:
I need to talk to Jackie. Get her on the dog and bone for me would you?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   slang  
" Donkey's years "
Meaning:
1. Cockney rhyming slang for ears. 2. A very long time.
Example:
1. Prince Charles has a fine pair of donkeys. 2. This is the first school reunion we've had since 1982. I haven't seen some of these people in donkey's years.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   date  
" Elephant's trunk "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for drunk.
Example:
He's been in the bar since we opened six hours ago. It's fair to assume that he's totally elephants by now.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   animals  
" Frog and toad "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for road.
Example:
Hurry up and move the car - I can see a traffic warden coming just down the frog and toad.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel  
" George Raft "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for daft.
Example:
That handstand on the window ledge. You could say he was brave or you could say he was George Raft.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   stupidity   name  
" Ginger Beer "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for queer.
Example:
Julian is ginger - and I don't mean that he's got red hair.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   drink   colour  
" Gregory Peck "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for neck.
Example:
It's freezing out there. Better get a scarf round your Gregory if you're going out.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   name  
" Half inch "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for pinch.
Example:
It's hopeless - whenever I try to start a DIY job I find that someone has half-inched some of my tools.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Have a Captain Cook "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for look.
Example:
Now madam, have a Captain Cook at these men and point out the one who attacked you.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  
" Hobson's choice "
Meaning:
1. A choice forced upon someone. 2. Cockney rhyming slang for voice.
Example:
1. There was only one room left in the hotel when we arrived, so we got Hobson's choice. 2. I've had a sore throat for a couple of days - now I'm beginning to lose my hobsons.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. Derived from the name of the carrier Thomas Hobson.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although mostly amongst the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   name   euphemism  
" It's all gone Pete Tong "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for gone wrong.
Example:
I thought I could make mayonnaise with butter. When I tried it all went Pete Tong.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, alluding to the popular DJ Pete Tong.
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  
" Jack Palancing "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for dancing.
Example:
Julie wants me to go with her to the ballroom for a night of Jack Palancing.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   dance   name  
" Jam jar "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for car.
Example:
Check my new Audi. Its the best jam jar I've ever owned.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   travel   food  
" Jimmy Riddle "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for piddle.
Example:
Now kids, this is going to be a long car trip and we don't want to be stopping every five minutes. Just go and have a Jimmy before we set off.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  
" Khyber pass "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for arse.
Example:
That was really insulting to my mother. When he bends over he's going to get a good kick up the khyber.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain. Note that the original pronunciation of 'pass' would have been 'parse', to rhyme with 'arse'. This reflects the 'long r' vocalisation of Cockneys. Current pronunciation depends on where you come from
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location  
" Loaf of bread "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for head.
Example:
Betting your wages on the toss of a coin isn't the best way to get out of debt - use your loaf mate.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   food  
" Lord Fred "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for bed.
Example:
The hamster escaped and the cat got it - it's Lord Fred for sure.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   death   name  
" Mince pies "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for eyes.
Example:
If that traffic warden comes back let me know - keep your minces open will you?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   body  
" Mutt and Jeff "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for deaf.
Example:
You have to shout - he's almost completely mutton.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   body   name  
" My old Dutch "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for duchess.
Example:
This year will be our silver wedding, the old dutch and me.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   country   family  
" My old china "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for mate.
Example:
We've been best pals since schooldays. He's my best china plate.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   country  
" North and south "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for mouth.
Example:
No, it's true! I heard it straight from her own north and south.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   body  
" On your Tod "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for alone.
Example:
The others have all gone out - I'm on my tod.
Where did it originate?:
Origin uncertain - possibly related to the US jockey Tod Sloan.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  
" Pen and ink "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for stink.
Example:
That drain cover should be an airtight seal but it's broken. There's a real pen and ink in here.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Plates of meat "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for feet.
Example:
I knew I shouldn't have agreed to help with the Christmas post. Ten miles up and down stairs today - my plates are killing me.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   the_human_body  
" Porky pies "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for lies.
Example:
You can't trust what he tells you - half of his stories are porkies.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Potatoes (or taters) in the mould "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for cold.
Example:
Whoa, it's the coldest day of the winter so far - really taters.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   weather  
" Rabbit and pork "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for talk.
Example:
He just goes on and on about his hobbies - rabbit, rabbit, rabbit!
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   animals   language  
" Rosie Lea "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for tea.
Example:
Put the kettle on would you? I'd love a nice cup of rosie lea.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   name  
" Ruby Murray "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for curry.
Example:
Every Friday night after work, the lads all pile into the Star of India for a ruby.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   name  
" Scarper Flow "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for go.
Example:
The police are on there way. With your record they are bound to think the fight was your fault - you'd better scarper before they get here.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   location  
" Sexton Blake "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for fake.
Example:
That picture was supposed to be by Monet but there was a mobile phone in the background - I knew right away it was a sexton.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  
" Syrup of figs "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for wig.
Example:
That thatch on Donald Trump's head - it has to be a syrup.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   hair  
" Take a butchers "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for look.
Example:
There's a triple rainbow over there. If you don't believe me take a butchers yourself.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Tea leaf "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for thief.
Example:
Just be careful to keep your purse safe when you go down to the market - there are plenty of tea leaves ready to steal it.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   crime   drink  
" Titfer tat "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for hat.
Example:
It looks like rain - I think I'll need a coat and my titfer.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes  
" Trouble and strife "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for wife.
Example:
Twenty years we've been married now, the trouble and strife and myself.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   conflict  
" Two and eight "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for state.
Example:
His clothes were awry and he'd lost one of his shoes - he was in a right two and eight.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number  
" Uncle Dick "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sick.
Example:
Sorry, I won't be into work today. I'll feeling Uncle Dick.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   medical   family   name  
" Use your loaf "
Meaning:
Think smart.
Example:
Sending money to that Nigerian email scam. Use your loaf, mate - wasn't it obvious it was a con?
Where did it originate?:
Britain, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most commonly in Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   the_human_body  
" Whistle and flute "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for suit.
Example:
That important interview is coming up next week. I think I ought to get a new whistle.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes  
" Would you Adam and Eve it? "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for would you believe it?
Example:
Amazing - he hit double top six times with six darts. Would you Adam and Eve it?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name  

 We are also on Facebook

 Copyright Gary Martin, 2019