Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"clothes" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word clothes

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word clothes

" A feather in one’s cap "
Meaning:
A symbol of achievement.
Example:
Getting nominated for an Oscar is the biggest feather in a film actor’s cap.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" A wolf in sheep’s clothing "
Meaning:
Someone who uses the pretence of kindliness to disguise their evil intent.
Example:
He was 38 but tried to pass himself off as a thirteen year old in order to get a date with a schoolgirl - a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
Where did it originate?:
Aesop.
Where is it used?:
Widely used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   trickery   animals  
" At the drop of a hat "
Meaning:
With no delay.
Example:
They were always ready to help. Just say the word and they'd be there at the drop of a hat.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   america  
" Daisy roots "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for boots.
Example:
I can't get them on. Either my feet have got bigger or these daisies have shrunk.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Dicky Dirt "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for shirt.
Example:
Jane's wedding today. I'll need a newly pressed dickie dirt for that.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   name   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Double denim "
Meaning:
Denim jeans worn with a denim shirt or jacket.
Example:
He only ever wears blue and usually it's jeans and a shirt - the full double denim.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 21st century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain and Australia.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   blue  
" Frock up "
Meaning:
Wear a smart or formal dress for a special occasion.
Example:
The boys all wore new suits for the formal and the girls frocked up.
Where did it originate?:
Australia, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Most common in Australia, but spreading worldwide
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   australian_origin  
" Hat trick "
Meaning:
A threefold feat in sports or some other activity.
Example:
Warne was really on good bowling form today - three wickets in three deliveries. That's the first hat-trick in the match.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sport  
" Men in suits "
Meaning:
Conventionally minded and dressed men who hold positions of authority. Also called just 'suits'.
Example:
Everyone in the office wanted a Santas and Elves party on Christmas Eve, but the suits said no.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1930s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   business   america  
" Nip slip "
Meaning:
The inadvertent exposure of a womans nipple.
Example:
Wearing a low cut dress like that, a nip slip was almost inevitable.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA and UK and not amongst the older generations.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   sex   body   slang   reduplication   america  
" Rags to riches "
Meaning:
From poverty to wealth.
Example:
J K Rowling was on benefits when she wrote Harry Potter. That's a real rags to riches story.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   business  
" Side boob "
Meaning:
The side of a female breast revealed by skimpy clothing.
Example:
That T-shirt is way too loose on Jane. She's showing acres of side boob.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, amongst the younger generations.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Sniff test "
Meaning:
Sniff an item of clothing (or food) to check if it might be suitable to wear (or eat).
Example:
I've worn that shirt before but when I gave the underarms the sniff test I thought I'd be okay to wear it again.
Where did it originate?:
Late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain, but becoming more common elsewhere.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" The bull in the bowler hat "
Meaning:
Jokey term for artificial insemination.
Example:
Leaving things to nature hasn't worked down here on the farm - only 10% of the cows are pregnant. We need a visit from the bull in the bowler hat.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   sex   euphemism  
" Titfer tat "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for hat.
Example:
It looks like rain - I think I'll need a coat and my titfer.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Wardrobe malfunction "
Meaning:
Referring to an item of clothing slipping out of place to expose part of the body.
Example:
Her top slipped down in front of the boys. She said it was a wardrobe malfunction but I think it was deliberate.
Where did it originate?:
USA. First said by Justin Timberlake to explain the inadvertent exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the half-time show at the 2004 Super Bowl.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   household_items   slang   america  
" Wear your heart on your sleeve "
Meaning:
Openly express your emotions.
Example:
He went on his knees in the town square and sang her a love song. You can't say that he doesn't wear his heart on his sleeve.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although somewhat old-fashioned.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Whistle and flute "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for suit.
Example:
That important interview is coming up next week. I think I ought to get a new whistle.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Winter drawers on "
Meaning:
British euphemistic joke.
Example:
Autumn is over and these summer clothes aren't keeping the cold out - winter drawers on I suppose.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century. A pun on the expression 'winter draws on' (that is, winter is approaching). 'Drawers' is a British slang term for knickers.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   weather   date   euphemism  
" Yarn bombing "
Meaning:
The adorning of public buildings with knitted or crocheted material - either for fun or to make a political point.
Example:
We wanted to draw attention to the trees that the council planned to cut down so we got the local guerrilla knitters to yarn bomb them for us.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 21st century.
Where is it used?:
Initially mostly Britain but quickly spreading to others countries.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   conflict  
" Zip your lip "
Meaning:
Say nothing; keep your mouth shut. Often shortened to 'zip it'.
Example:
I saw Kevin put sneezing powder in the staff room but he told me to zip my lip about it or it would spoil the joke.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1940s. Deriving from the allusion to closing a garment with a zipper.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common in the USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   cliche   america  

 We are also on Facebook

 Copyright Gary Martin, 2019