Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"clock" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word clock

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word clock

" About time "
Meaning:
1. Almost time. 2. High time.
Example:
1. Hurry up, it’s about time for the game to start. 2. These running shoes are worn through. It’s about time I got a new pair.
Where did it originate?:
1. and 2., both British.
Where is it used?:
Both meanings widely used.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   patience  
" Against the clock "
Meaning:
In a great hurry to complete something before a set deadline.
Example:
Sorry, no pub lunch for me today, I’m up against the clock. This report’s got to be done by 6pm or I’m dead.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century. The allusion being that someone is in a race against the clock.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   work   time  
" Nine to five "
Meaning:
A standard office day, between 9am and 5pm. Often used to denote the boring nature of the weekly working routine.
Example:
This 9 to 5 slog really gets me down by about wednesday - I'm waiting for the weekend to come.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   work  
" Stupid-o'clock "
Meaning:
Very early in the morning.
Example:
We were out clubbing until three and then went on to Jack's for a drink. We didn't get home until stupid-o'clock.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain, and mainly amongst young adults.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   time   stupidity  

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