Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"business" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word business

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word business

" Company man "
Meaning:
A worker especially loyal to the employer he works for.
Example:
Jack's been with us for thirty years and hardly missed a day. He's our number one company man.
Where is it used?:
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" Factory farming "
Meaning:
Rearing livestock under industrial conditions.
Example:
I'm dead against factory farming of pigs. I prefer to see them out in the open air, rooting about for their food.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   animals   nature   america  
" Flea market "
Meaning:
A market used to buy and sell inexpensive goods. The kind of place that might sell carpets infested with fleas.
Example:
I need some cheap costume jewelry for the school play. Maybe the flea market would be the place.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   building   animals  
" Get down to brass tacks "
Meaning:
Concern yourself with the basic and important realities.
Example:
Were broke. This is no time for fanciful ideas - we need to get down to brass tacks and raise some money.
Where did it originate?:
America, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
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" Glass ceiling "
Meaning:
An unacknowledged or unseen discriminatory barrier that prevents women and minorities from rising to positions of power.
Example:
I've more experience, better qualifications and work harder than my male co-workers, yet I still don't get promoted and no one tells me why. I guess that's what they call the glass ceiling.
Where did it originate?:
America, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   building  
" Go for broke "
Meaning:
Put every resource into getting a particular result.
Example:
We needed a goal so we went for broke to score and forgot about defence.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid 20th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   excess   america  
" In the bag "
Meaning:
Something that is secured.
Example:
I knew when they sent all the other interviewees home that my job application was in the bag.
Where did it originate?:
USA,, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   cliche   america  
" Mates rates "
Meaning:
A discount price offered to friends.
Example:
I can't really afford to get the roof fixed but my pal Jim is a builder, maybe hell give me mates rates.
Where did it originate?:
Australian origin, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common down under.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   money   australian_origin  
" Men in suits "
Meaning:
Conventionally minded and dressed men who hold positions of authority. Also called just 'suits'.
Example:
Everyone in the office wanted a Santas and Elves party on Christmas Eve, but the suits said no.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1930s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   clothes   america  
" Off the record "
Meaning:
Something said in confidence that the one speaking doesn't want repeated.
Example:
The minister won't talk to reporters since his last off the record briefing got into the papers.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1930s.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   language   secrets   america  
" On the record "
Meaning:
Something said in confidence that the one speaking is happy to have repeated.
Example:
As finance minister I'm on the record as supporting increased spending on welfare, and you can quote me on that.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   language   america  
" Rags to riches "
Meaning:
From poverty to wealth.
Example:
J K Rowling was on benefits when she wrote Harry Potter. That's a real rags to riches story.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
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More idioms about:   clothes  
" Red tape "
Meaning:
Bureaucracy, especially in public business.
Example:
It's hardly worth applying for a grant from the council. There's so much red tape to contend with it will take years.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   colour  
" Top banana "
Meaning:
The leading, most important, person in a group or organisation.
Example:
Russia is supposed to be a democracy but everyone knows Putin is top banana and what he says goes.
Where did it originate?:
USA. Derived from burlesque shows where the top comic was given a banana.
Where is it used?:
Mostly USA.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   fruit   america  

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