Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"biblical" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word biblical

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word biblical

" A drop in the bucket (or ocean) "
Meaning:
A very small part of a bigger whole.
Example:
The country’s debt has risen to a trillion pounds. Paying off a billion is just a drop in the bucket.
Where did it originate?:
The Bible.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   household_items  
" A fly in the ointment "
Meaning:
A small flaw that spoils the whole.
Example:
It was good to win the gold but not being able to attend the ceremony to collect it was the fly in the ointment.
Where did it originate?:
The Bible.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals  
" A house divided against itself cannot stand "
Meaning:
Failure is certain if those on the same side argue amongst themselves.
Example:
The Tory party can’t stop arguing over Europe. Don’t they know that a house divided cannot stand.
Where did it originate?:
Biblical.
Where is it used?:
Widespread but uncommon. Rather formal for everyday speech.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   proverbial   adage  
" A leopard can’t change his spots "
Meaning:
You cannot change your innate self.
Example:
He was a bully at school and he’s a bully now - a leopard can’t change its spots.
Where did it originate?:
Biblical.
Where is it used?:
Widespread but rather formal form of expression. Not widely used by the young.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   proverbial   habit  
" Beat around the bush "
Meaning:
Avoiding the main topic.
Example:
If you want Jill to go out with her, don't beat around the bush - ask her.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1400s. One of the oldest non-Biblical phrases in the language.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nature  
" Flesh and blood "
Meaning:
1 - One's family. 2 - the bodily stuff we are made of.
Example:
1 - We aren't putting Dad into a home. He is our flesh and blood after all. 2 - It's so hot in here - almost more than flesh and blood can stand.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 10th century, from a biblical source.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   the_human_body   family  
" Good Samaritan "
Meaning:
Someone who compassionately helps another who is in need.
Example:
I'd lost my wallet and couldn't get home. He played the good Samaritan and gave me a lift to my door.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. From a biblical source.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   religion   name   country  
" The apple of my eye "
Meaning:
Someone who is cherished above all others.
Example:
She's my only child - the apple of my eye.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 9th century - making it one of the oldest phrases in the language that is still in regular use in its original form.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   fruit   the_human_body   cliche  
" The last straw "
Meaning:
The last of a series of problems, which pushes one's endurance beyond its limits.
Example:
I've put up with his taunting for years but picking on my daughter was the last straw and I punched him.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:

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