Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"aphorism" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word aphorism

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word aphorism

" A bad workman always blames his tools "
Meaning:
A proverb that suggests a poor workman tends to look for an excuse for his poor work.
Example:
It was really Andy’s fault that the wall he built fell down but he tried to claim that the cement mixer was faulty.
Where did it originate?:
The expression is found in British collections of proverbs from the 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but less commonly than 50 years ago.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   work   proverbial  
" A fool and his money are soon parted "
Meaning:
A foolish person is very likely to lose his money.
Example:
He’s off to the casino again - ’a fool and his money...’ I say.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   money   proverbial   stupidity  
" Blood is thicker than water "
Meaning:
Family loyalties are stronger than those to other people.
Example:
It was just me and his son in the job interview. I had no chance, blood is thicker than water you know.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. Probably coined by Sir Walter Scott, 1815.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   nature  
" It never rains but it pours "
Meaning:
When troubles come they often come together.
Example:
The boiler broke down, the weather turned freezing and Jack's got the flu. It never rains but it pours!
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but somewhat old-fashioned.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   weather  

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