Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"adage" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word adage

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word adage

" A golden key can open any door "
Meaning:
Money always has a telling influence.
Example:
He’s not really good enough to be an F1 driver but he got in the team because he brought a major sponsorship deal with him. As they say, a golden key can open any door.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but somewhat uncommon.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   money   proverbial  
" A house divided against itself cannot stand "
Meaning:
Failure is certain if those on the same side argue amongst themselves.
Example:
The Tory party can’t stop arguing over Europe. Don’t they know that a house divided cannot stand.
Where did it originate?:
Biblical.
Where is it used?:
Widespread but uncommon. Rather formal for everyday speech.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   biblical   proverbial  
" A picture paints a thousand words "
Meaning:
Pictures are far more descriptive than words.
Example:
I tried to describe that fantastic sunset and then she just showed them a photo. You know it’s true - a picture paints a thousand words.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
A very widely and commonly used proverb/adage.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   language   number   america  
" A stitch in time saves nine "
Meaning:
A small effort made at the right time might save a calamity later on.
Example:
Fixing that frayed rope was a real stitch in time. It would probably have snapped when the wind got up later if we hadn’t.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. A very old proverb.
Where is it used?:
In use worldwide, but less commonly than before and mainly by the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   number   time  
" Absence makes the heart grow fonder "
Meaning:
Our feelings for people and things grows when we are apart from them.
Example:
I enjoyed visiting Italy but after a few weeks I couldn’t wait to get home to my wife. As they say - absense makes the heart grow fonder.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Still used, predominantly in the UK, mostly by the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   emotion  
" Actions speak louder than words "
Meaning:
Actions show one’s character more than what you say.
Example:
She spoke up for the immigrants but he gave them a bed in his house - actions speak louder than words.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   effort   language  
" Breast is best "
Meaning:
Slogan of breastfeeding campaign.
Example:
I bottle-fed all my kids. I know they say breast is best but they all lived to tell the tale.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   family   the_human_body  
" It takes two to tango "
Meaning:
It takes two people to cause a problem between them.
Example:
Maybe Jack did provoke the argument but he couldn't argue on his own could he? - it takes two to tango.
Where did it originate?:
USA, from a popular 1952 song of the same name.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number   dance   america  
" Variety is the spice of life "
Meaning:
Increased experience makes for a more exciting life.
Example:
Surfing today, bungie-jumping tomorrow. You know what they say - variety is the spice of life.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   excess  
" You are what you eat "
Meaning:
What you eat affects you health.
Example:
Burgers every evening? That's not a good plan - don't you know you are what you eat?
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1920s.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   food   medical   america  
" You can't judge a book by its cover "
Meaning:
Decisions can't be made solely on appearance.
Example:
Raphael Nadal looked like he was straight from a street gang. I guess you can't judge a book by its cover.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
" You can't take it with you "
Meaning:
Suggestion that you should spend money and live life now as it will be no use to you after you die.
Example:
Grandma saved all her life but lived on a pittance. No one told her that you can't take it with you.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1930s - deriving from several similar idioms dating from the early 19th century onward.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   money   death  

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