Meaning of proverb

Posted by Michael james on December 16, 2003

In Reply to: Meaning of proverb posted by Harold on November 17, 2003

: please take a look at some modern day words of real philosophy by myself Michael James: : : : : Literacy homework, to find the meaning of some proverbs, not known the meaning of people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones, can you help? please

: : : : : Check this out in the archives 22

: : : : : people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.. - Marilyn Getty 07/26/03
: : : : : people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.. - James Briggs 07/26/03
: : : : : people in glass houses - ESC 07/26/03
: : : : : people in glass houses - masakim 07/26/03

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: : : : There is an equally valid proverb which is: People in Grass houses shouln't stow thrones. This was first aired on a British comedy radio programme and alludes to that fact that thrones - being heavy and often carved from marble or cast in gold - cannot be easily, or safely, stowed in the roofs of grass houses.

: : : PEOPLE IN GLASS HOUSES SHOULDN'T THROW STONES - "Those who are vulnerable should not attack others. The proverb has been traced back to Geoffrey Chaucer's 'Troilus and Criseyde' . George Herbert wrote in 1651: 'Whose house is of glass, must not throw stones at another.' This saying is first cited in the United States in 'William & Mary College Quarterly' . Twenty-six later Benjamin Franklin wrote, 'Don't throw stones at your neighbors', if your own windows are glass.' 'To live in a glass house' is used as a figure of speech referring to vulnerability." From Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings by Gregory Y. Titelman (Random House, New York, 1996).

: : "There is an equally valid proverb which is: People in Grass houses shouln't stow thrones." We can't really call that an equally valid proverb. It's a modern parody of the real proverb.

: Now, now R.Berg what you are expressing is an opinion and, what's more, it's your opinion and, what's worse, you've expressed it in the hope that it's an adequate put down that will enhance your ego - shame on you. I would have thought that to stow thrones in the fragile roof of a grass house was inadvisable to say the least and that those who habitually inhabit such abodes should refrain from engaging in this dangerous practice. It's interesting to note that both grass houses and thrones predate glass houses, hence there are grounds for postulating the theory that the stowing of thrones in the roofs of grass houses predated the tossing of rocks through the crudely cast panes of glass used in early glass houses. Q.E.D (quod erat demonstrandum)