Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"stupidity" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word stupidity

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word stupidity

" A fool and his money are soon parted "
Meaning:
A foolish person is very likely to lose his money.
Example:
He's off to the casino again - 'a fool and his money...' I say.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   money   proverbial   aphorism  
" A fool's paradise "
Meaning:
A state of euphoria with no basis in reality.
Example:
He thinks he is going to get the top job but there's no chance of that. He's just living in a fool's paradise.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 16th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   shakespeare  
" A load of cobblers "
Meaning:
Nonsense.
Example:
He says he has invented a perpetual motion machine, which is clearly a load of cobblers.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used, especially in the UK. Slang and borderline swearing - not one for your Grandma.
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   nonsense  
" A load of codswallop "
Meaning:
Nonsense.
Example:
You can't keep champagne fresh by putting a spoon in the neck of the bottle - that's a load of codswallop.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly used in the UK but known elsewhere too. Mostly used by the older generation.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   nonsense  
" Baby brain "
Meaning:
Confusion or forgetfulness caused by lack of sleep when caring for a new-born.
Example:
I put baby Julie's bottle of milk away in the oven today - must be baby brain.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   family  
" Fool's gold "
Meaning:
Something that appears valuable but really isn't, like iron pyrites - a worthless mineral that resembles gold.
Example:
The investment promised 80% returns but turned out to make a loss - just fools gold I guess.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   trickery  
" Fuddy-duddy "
Meaning:
An old-fashioned and foolish type of person.
Example:
He irons his socks. He's a real fuddy-duddy.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   reduplication  
" George Raft "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for daft.
Example:
That handstand on the window ledge. You could say he was brave or you could say he was George Raft.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang   name  
" Method to my madness "
Meaning:
Odd actions that appear meaningless but are done for a good reason.
Example:
Mixing cooking oil with the petrol might seem a little odd, but just wait, you'll see there's method in my madness.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. From Shakespeare's Hamlet, as 'though this is madness, yet there is method in it'.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   shakespeare  
" Not all there "
Meaning:
Not in possession of one's mental faculties.
Example:
He's a bit slow to learn. Some say he's not quite all there.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
" Not playing with a full deck "
Meaning:
Someone who lacks intelligence.
Example:
I asked him to meet me in Derby and he went to Denby. Sometimes I don't think he's playing with a full deck.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in Britain than elsewhere.
More idioms about:   madness  
" Off one's rocker "
Meaning:
Crazy; out of one's mind.
Example:
Ozzy Osbourne - he's a rocker who is off his rocker!
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1890s
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in Britain than elsewhere.
" Stupid-o'clock "
Meaning:
Very early in the morning.
Example:
We were out clubbing until three and then went on to Jack's for a drink. We didn't get home until stupid-o'clock.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain, and mainly amongst young adults.
More idioms about:   time  

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