Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"religion" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word religion

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word religion

" A doubting Thomas "
Meaning:
A sceptic who won't accept a widely believed truth until seeing the evidence in person.
Example:
I told him he would need a raincoat but, doubting Thomas that he his, he had to check the forecast for himself.
Where did it originate?:
From the Biblical story of Thomas, the apostle who doubted Jesus' resurrection.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   name  
" A thorn in my flesh "
Meaning:
A persistent and difficult to ignore annoyance.
Example:
The anti-capitalist campaigners turned up at every political meeting. They were are real thorn in the flesh for the government.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   nature  
" An act of God "
Meaning:
Some event that is considered to be outside human control. Commonly used in insurance policies to refer to events that the insured cannot be held responsible for.
Example:
The insurance company had to pay up for the lightning strike damage. After all, it wasn't my fault, it was an act of God.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. Used from the 13th century in its original religious sense and from the mid 19th century when referring to insurance claims.
Where is it used?:
" Come hell or high water "
Meaning:
Despite any great difficult or obstacle.
Example:
I'm going to get to Cornwall by nightfall, come hell or high water.
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 19th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   nature  
" Going to hell in a handbasket "
Meaning:
Deteriorating and headed for complete disaster.
Example:
When the British went over the top at the Somme the soldiers didn't realise they were headed for hell in a handbasket.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   household_items   hyperbole  
" Good Samaritan "
Meaning:
Someone who compassionately helps another who is in need.
Example:
I'd lost my wallet and couldn't get home. He played the good Samaritan and gave me a lift to my door.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. From a biblical source.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   biblical   name   country  
" Hell bent "
Meaning:
Determined to achieve something at all costs.
Example:
Susie broke her ankle a mile from the end of the marathon but she was hell bent to finish and stumbled over the line on crutches.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although more common in the USA than elsewhere.
More idioms about:   excess  
" In limbo "
Meaning:
In an uncertain situation, over which you have no control (a reference to the state of being outside both heaven and hell).
Example:
Jack said he would collect us after our camping trip on the moors, but until he arrives we are in limbo.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
" Keep body and soul together "
Meaning:
Earn sufficient money in order to keep yourself alive.
Example:
The minimum wage is too low. Its hardly enough to keep body and soul together.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" No saint "
Meaning:
Someone who might claim to be of good behaviour but has in fact a sordid past.
Example:
She was critical of those girls in short skirts but she's no saint herself I can tell you.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   crime  
" On a wing and a prayer "
Meaning:
In a difficult situation and reliant on luck to get out of it.
Example:
Jean was out on her feet after two miles. She was on a wing and a prayer to get to the end of the marathon.
Where did it originate?:
USA. From a 1940s film script.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   luck  
" Play Devil's advocate "
Meaning:
A person who takes a contrary position from the one being presented, either for the sake of argument or to test the validity of the opposing point of view.
Example:
I didn't really disagree with what he was saying but I decided to play devil's advocate just to get him to try to make a better case for it.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 18th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   trickery  
" Talk of the devil! "
Meaning:
Said when someone that you have just been talking about arrives.
Example:
Did you know that Jim is gay? Oh, talk of the devil - here he is.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   language  
" The God Squad "
Meaning:
enthusiastic Christian believers.
Example:
Every friday we the doorbell goes and it's the Jehovah's Witnesses or some other god squad folks.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1960s
Where is it used?:
" Vatican roulette "
Meaning:
The rhythm method of birth control.
Example:
It's a real dilemma for my wife and me. I know Bridget is a Catholic and that condoms aren't allowed, but I don't want kids yet and Vatican roulette is just too risky for me.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1960s
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   sex   risk  

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