Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"name" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word name

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word name

" A doubting Thomas "
Meaning:
A sceptic who won't accept a widely believed truth until seeing the evidence in person.
Example:
I told him he would need a raincoat but, doubting Thomas that he his, he had to check the forecast for himself.
Where did it originate?:
From the Biblical story of Thomas, the apostle who doubted Jesus' resurrection.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   religion  
" Adam's ale "
Meaning:
A reference to water - often used to emphasize the purity of water compared to other drinks.
Example:
I didn't want a beer when I finished the marathon - Adam's ale was all I needed.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common in the UK.
More idioms about:   water  
" Dicky Dirt "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for shirt.
Example:
Jane's wedding today. I'll need a newly pressed dickie dirt for that.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   clothes   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Elvis has left the building "
Meaning:
The primary performer has left. There's no point waiting around.
Example:
Go away. We're closed. It's all over. Nothing to see here. Elvis has left the building. Do I need to go on?
Where did it originate?:
USA, late 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in the USA than elsewhere.
More idioms about:   music   building  
" Full monty "
Meaning:
Everything possible. The whole thing.
Example:
Six sixes in one over. He really gave it the full monty.
Where did it originate?:
The precise origin is uncertain. Since the 1997 film of the same name, the expression has also been associated with full-frontal nudity.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   sex  
" George Raft "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for daft.
Example:
That handstand on the window ledge. You could say he was brave or you could say he was George Raft.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   stupidity   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Good Samaritan "
Meaning:
Someone who compassionately helps another who is in need.
Example:
I'd lost my wallet and couldn't get home. He played the good Samaritan and gave me a lift to my door.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. From a biblical source.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   biblical   religion   country  
" Gregory Peck "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for neck.
Example:
It's freezing out there. Better get a scarf round your Gregory if you're going out.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   the_human_body   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Harry spankers "
Meaning:
Brand spanking new.
Example:
I just driven the car direct from the showroom - it's absolutely Harry Spankers.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly in the UK and mostly amongst the middle and upper classes.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" Have a Captain Cook "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for look.
Example:
Now madam, have a Captain Cook at these men and point out the one who attacked you.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Hobson's choice "
Meaning:
1. A choice forced upon someone. 2. Cockney rhyming slang for voice.
Example:
1. There was only one room left in the hotel when we arrived, so we got Hobson's choice. 2. I've had a sore throat for a couple of days - now I'm beginning to lose my hobsons.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century. Derived from the name of the carrier Thomas Hobson.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, although mostly amongst the older generation.
More idioms about:   the_human_body   cockney_rhyming_slang   euphemism  
" In like Flynn "
Meaning:
To be easily successful, especially concerning sex or romance.
Example:
Since he had that lottery win and the nose job, he's in like Flynn with the girls.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1940s.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but more common in the USA than elsewhere.
More idioms about:   sex   slang  
" It's all gone Pete Tong "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for gone wrong.
Example:
I thought I could make mayonnaise with butter. When I tried it all went Pete Tong.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, alluding to the popular DJ Pete Tong.
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Jack Palancing "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for dancing.
Example:
Julie wants me to go with her to the ballroom for a night of Jack Palancing.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   dance   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Jimmy Riddle "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for piddle.
Example:
Now kids, this is going to be a long car trip and we don't want to be stopping every five minutes. Just go and have a Jimmy before we set off.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Lord Fred "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for bed.
Example:
The hamster escaped and the cat got it - it's Lord Fred for sure.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   death   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Mrs Mop "
Meaning:
traditional English name for a cleaning woman.
Example:
I just don't have time to work full time, look after the kids and keep the house clean - perhaps I should get a Mrs. Mop.
Where did it originate?:
Britain. First used in the 1940s radio show ITMA.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   household_items  
" Mutt and Jeff "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for deaf.
Example:
You have to shout - he's almost completely mutton.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   body   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" On your Tod "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for alone.
Example:
The others have all gone out - I'm on my tod.
Where did it originate?:
Origin uncertain - possibly related to the US jockey Tod Sloan.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Peeping Tom "
Meaning:
Someone who covertly observes sexually active or naked people.
Example:
Her habit of sunbathing topless really brings out the peeping Toms.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, late 18th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   sex  
" Rosie Lea "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for tea.
Example:
Put the kettle on would you? I'd love a nice cup of rosie lea.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mainly Britain.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   drink   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Ruby Murray "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for curry.
Example:
Every Friday night after work, the lads all pile into the Star of India for a ruby.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   food   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Sexton Blake "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for fake.
Example:
That picture was supposed to be by Monet but there was a mobile phone in the background - I knew right away it was a sexton.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Uncle Dick "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for sick.
Example:
Sorry, I won't be into work today. I'll feeling Uncle Dick.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   medical   family   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Uncle Tom "
Meaning:
A derogatory term for a black man who is servile towards white men.
Example:
Randy never stands up for us blacks. In the old days we'd have called him an Uncle Tom - these days people call him a coconut (that is, brown on the outside but white on the inside).
Where did it originate?:
USA, 1920s. Derived from the name of the hero in the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common in the USA.
More idioms about:   family  
" Van Gogh's ear for music "
Meaning:
Tone deaf.
Example:
I'd love to join the choir but my audition was a disaster. The conductor said I had Van Gogh's ear for music.
Where did it originate?:
An ironic joke alluding to Van Gogh's celebrated loss of his ear, coined in Britain in the late 20th century. The source idiom 'ear for music' has been used in Britain since the 18th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain and not a common idiom.
More idioms about:   the_human_body   music   hyperbole  
" Would you Adam and Eve it? "
Meaning:
Cockney rhyming slang for would you believe it?
Example:
Amazing - he hit double top six times with six darts. Would you Adam and Eve it?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain.
More idioms about:   cockney_rhyming_slang  
" Your name is mud "
Meaning:
You are discredited or in disgrace. The very mention of your name produces scorn.
Example:
Since the hundreds of reports of his abuse of children, Jimmy Saville's name is mud in the UK.
Where did it originate?:
USA. The allusion is to Dr. Samuel Mudd, the man who was accused of the shooting of President Abraham Lincoln
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   disgust  

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