Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"money" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word money

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word money

" A bigger bang for your buck "
Meaning:
Better value for your money.
Example:
Those Chinese fireworks are so cheap. We literally get a bigger bang for our buck.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but overused to the point of cliche.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   cliche  
" A dime a dozen "
Meaning:
So commonplace as to be of little consequence.
Example:
Red buses in London. they're a dime a dozen.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   number  
" A fool and his money are soon parted "
Meaning:
A foolish person is very likely to lose his money.
Example:
He's off to the casino again - 'a fool and his money...' I say.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   proverbial   stupidity   aphorism  
" A golden key can open any door "
Meaning:
Money always has a telling influence.
Example:
He's not really good enough to be an F1 driver but he got in the team because he brought a major sponsorship deal with him. As they say, a golden key can open any door.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but somewhat uncommon.
More idioms about:   proverbial   adage  
" A penny for your thoughts "
Meaning:
A way of asking what someone is thinking.
Example:
You've been gazing out the window with a wistful look for ages. A penny for your thoughts?
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 16th century.
Where is it used?:
Most common in Britain (although we don't use pennies here any longer).
" A penny saved is a penny earned "
Meaning:
Anything you save has the same effect as adding to your income.
Example:
I put all my small change into a jar every day. It's not much, but a penny saved is a penny earned.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but uncommon.
More idioms about:   work  
" An arm and a leg "
Meaning:
Very expensive. A large amount of money.
Example:
That new lawnmower is top of the range. It cost me an arm and a leg.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-20th century. Often mistakenly thought to be related to the high cost of painting full-length portraits.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Bean counter "
Meaning:
A disparaging term for an accountant or anyone who compiles statistics.
Example:
It's a shame. Jim was a first rate pure mathematician but the bank offered him so much money to be their bean counter he decided to take it.
Where did it originate?:
New Zealand.
Where is it used?:
" Bedroom tax "
Meaning:
slang term for UK's removal of Spare Room Subsidy.
Example:
Just because I've got a room to keep my son's wheelchair I'm going to be caught by the bedroom tax.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, following the introduction of the Spare Room Subsidy in the UK in 2013.
Where is it used?:
Britain.
" Beyond price "
Meaning:
To be so prized and valuable as to not be obtainable by money.
Example:
Getting in to the school hall for the annual nativity play cost us $5 but seeing little Angie in the lead role was beyond price.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   excellence  
" Chicken feed "
Meaning:
Something of little importance, especially a small sum of money.
Example:
The newsagent is really ripping off the kids who deliver the papers for him. He's paying them chicken feed.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid-19th century.
Where is it used?:
" Mates rates "
Meaning:
A discount price offered to friends.
Example:
I can't really afford to get the roof fixed but my pal Jim is a builder, maybe hell give me mates rates.
Where did it originate?:
Australian origin, 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common down under.
More idioms about:   business   australian_origin  
" Nest egg "
Meaning:
Savings set aside for future use.
Example:
That pension will keep building until I'm 65. Its a good little nest egg.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 17th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   nature  
" Ring fencing "
Meaning:
Earmarking funds to guarantee a specific project can go ahead.
Example:
The government is making major cuts in spending, but at least the hospital will stay open - medical funding is ring-fenced.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
" Scot-free "
Meaning:
Without payment.
Example:
He was lucky that the traffic warden's pen ran out and he didn't get a ticket. He got off scot free.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 16th century. Not, as is often thought, related to the American slave Dred Scott.
Where is it used?:
" Scrape together "
Meaning:
To manage, with difficulty, enough of what is needed - especially money.
Example:
Between three three of us we managed to scrape together 5 for a taxi home.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   effort  
" Skid row "
Meaning:
The rundown area of a city inhabited by the destitute.
Example:
Lost my job, Jill left me, started drinking - pretty soon I was on skid row.
Where did it originate?:
USA, early 20th century.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but most common in the USA.
" Where there's muck there's brass "
Meaning:
Dirt and muddle are evidence of products being manufactured and money (brass) being made.
Example:
Stuff was coming in and out of the factory yard every five minutes and debris was piled everywhere. Business was brisk though - where there's muck there's brass you know.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - especially Yorkshire.
Where is it used?:
England, most commonly in the north of England.
Hear the idiom spoken:
" You can't take it with you "
Meaning:
Suggestion that you should spend money and live life now as it will be no use to you after you die.
Example:
Grandma saved all her life but lived on a pittance. No one told her that you can't take it with you.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1930s - deriving from several similar idioms dating from the early 19th century onward.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   death   adage  

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