Idioms title

The Idiom Attic - a collection of hundreds of English idioms, each one explained.

"childhood" idioms...

See also, the Phrase Thesaurus list of phrases that contain the word childhood

and, a list of phrases that relate in some way the word childhood

" Ankle biter "
Meaning:
A slang term for small child.
Example:
Janice is pregnant again. With the twins still only two there's soon going to be three ankle biters around the place.
Where did it originate?:
USA, 19th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   the-human-body   slang  
" Brum brum "
Meaning:
Child's play idiom expressing the sound of a vehicle.
Example:
Mummy, my toy train goes chuff, chuff, chuff and my car goes brum, brum.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   reduplication  
" Children should be seen and not heard "
Meaning:
Old proverb suggesting that children should not impinge on the adult world.
Example:
Grandma is a bit strict. We shouldn't judge her though - things were tougher in her childhood. She was expected to be seen and not heard.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Rarely used seriously any longer. Now more likely be heard in black and white movies than in real life.
More idioms about:   proverbial  
" Gee gee "
Meaning:
Childish term for a horse.
Example:
Now Jimmy, whats that picture? Is it a bar lamb or is it a gee-gee?
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used, but more in the UK than elsewhere and mainly in conversation with small children.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   animals   reduplication  
" Little devil! "
Meaning:
An exclamation of surprise and annoyance, directed at someone who has behaved badly or performed some kind of prank. Often applied to children.
Example:
Do you know what those little devils from next door have done now? They've tied the doorknob to the gatepost and I can't get out.
Where did it originate?:
Britain - 17th century.
Where is it used?:
Mostly Britain, but used occasionally elsewhere too.
" New kid on the block "
Meaning:
Someone new to the group or area.
Example:
Let's go and play with him. Its hard being the new kid on the block.
Where did it originate?:
USA, mid 20th century.
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   location  
" Ups a daisy "
Meaning:
A saying, usually to a child, after a stumble or fall, to encourage them to get up. (ups is a variant of whoops).
Example:
Ooh, Tommy the toddler, fallen over again have you? Never mind - ups a daisy and let's try again.
Where did it originate?:
America, 20th century. The expression sounds old and English, but it isn't.
Where is it used?:
Worldwide, but considered dated and coy by many.
Hear the idiom spoken:
More idioms about:   misfortune  
" Wet behind the ears "
Meaning:
Young and naive, like a new-born baby.
Example:
That Justin Bieber; he thinks he's all grown up but he's really pretty wet behind the ears.
Where did it originate?:
Britain, 1910s
Where is it used?:
More idioms about:   the_human_body  
" Whipper snapper "
Meaning:
A child or impertinent youth.
Example:
The fourth form have challenged the teachers to a tug of war. We can't lose against a bunch of kids - let's show those whipper snappers how it's done.
Where did it originate?:
Where is it used?:
Widely used but a little old fashioned.
More idioms about:   reduplication  

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