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Re: Jesus H. Christ; Jesus Herald Christ

Posted by ESC on March 14, 2008 at 10:20:

In Reply to: Re: Jesus H. Christ; Jesus Herald Christ posted by Baceseras on March 13, 2008 at 13:56:

: : The meaning of this phrase/saying/term posted on this website seems to be incorrect. Today, the use of this phrase really has nothing to do with what it means. Its usually used in an exclamatory fashion. I.e. when you stub your toe you say, "Jesus H. Christ"! in lieu of something more profane. However, the origin of this phrase relates simply to Jesus being considered a messenger/prophet and deliver of the Lord's message.

: : It is widely believed and thought that "Jesus Christ" was Jesus' name and surname, much like "John Smith" would be another mans name and surname. In current times, "John Smith" means simply "John Smith;" but when the use of surnames began, it was very likely that our friend John was a smith of some sort, i.e. John the Lock Smith or John the Iron Smith. Similarly, the surname "Christ" refers to Jesus' role/job in his time and in history. This is evidenced by the literal definition of the word "Christ;" which is "any expected deliverer" and/or "messiah" (expected king and deliverer of the Hebrews). "Jesus Christ," as a name, was meant to be understood as "Jesus the Savior," "Jesus the Messiah," or "Jesus the Deliverer." By the same token, the literal definition of the word "herald" is "an official crier or messenger," "one that precedes or foreshadows," "one that conveys news or proclaims," or "one who actively promotes or advocates." The conclusion is that "Jesus Herald Christ!" is a phrase meant to convey that Jesus of Nazareth was an advocate and proclaimer of the message of salvation and delivery.

: I regret to inform you that this notion of "H is for 'Herald'" is simple well-intentioned balderdash. The aim, for whoever concocted thie explanation, was to salvage a profane vulgarism ("Jesus H. Christ!") for piety by supplying it with a fake pedigree. "Herald" in this case is an afterthought: the expostulation owes its existence to the brusque pleasure of the sound of its syllables, and the mild shock of the sense.

Hallowed be thy name. Translated to Howard (or Harold) be thy name.