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Re: Have at thee

Posted by Pamela on April 17, 2008 at 00:28:

In Reply to: Have at thee posted by Josh on April 15, 2008 at 13:24:

: Have at thee.
: What is this phrase actually saying, and what are its origins?

THE HISTORY OF KING HENRY THE SIXTH, THIRD PART
by William Shakespeare

CLIFFORD.
Now, Richard, I am with thee here alone.
This is the hand that stabbed thy father York,
And this the hand that slew thy brother Rutland;
And here's the heart that triumphs in their death,
And cheers these hands that slew thy sire and brother
To execute the like upon thyself;
And so have at thee!

[They fight. Warwick enters; Clifford flies.]

I assume it means the same as "I'll have you!" meaning "I'll fight you!"

Pamela