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Re: "dogs off chains".

Posted by Smokey Stover on January 13, 2007

In Reply to: "Dogs off chains". posted by Feargal Kinsella on January 11, 2007

: In sailing circles, when the wind is very strong it is sometimes said to be blowing "dogs off chains". Possibly this means that it is strong enough to, literally, pull a dog from its tether chain, but is there another explanation or origin for this phrase?

"Blowing Dogs off Chains" (an Aussie/Kiwi expression for a windy day)...."

Or: As predicted, today (Tuesday) in AKL [Auckland] it has been raining cats and dogs, and "blowing dogs off chains."

Question 2: Its blowing dogs off chains, I am approaching the lay line down wind [i.e., downwind] at warp speed, what is the top tip for surviving the gybe? (From a boating site.)

I don't know why this particular metaphor. It's used mostly as "blowing dogs off chains," describing strong winds over open water, mostly by Antipodean sailors. A wind strong enough to blow a dog off his chain is some wind!
SS