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How hot is it?

Posted by ESC on July 19, 2006

Hot as fresh milk - Said by Tom Cassidy, the rich man who flashed his cash in Psycho . Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) stole his money.

Hot as the backlog o' hell -- From "Cowboy Lingo: A Dictionary of the Slack-Jaw Words and Whangdoodle Ways of the American West" by Ramon F. Adams (Houghton Mifflin, New York, 2000. Copyright 1936). Page 216.

Hot enough that the dog was chasing the cat and they were both walking. -- Online discussion forum, July 19, 2006.

Hotter than a hen in a wool blanket - "I still felt hotter than a hen in a wool basket and made and outdone." From "Shady Grove," a Kentucky novel by Janice Holt Giles (Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, 1967). Page 250.

Hotter than a two-dollar pistol - Very hot, an allusion to cheap 19th-century pistols that go hot when fired. From the Mountain Range chapter,"Facts on File Dictionary of American Regionalisms: Local Expressions from Coast to Coast" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 2000). Page 376.

Hotter than bus station chili - Kentucky man in his 40s. 2006.

Hotter than hell in August - From "Cold Shoulder" by Lynda La Plante (Random House, New York, 1994, 1996). Page 338.

Hotter than hell with the blower on -- From "Cowboy Lingo: A Dictionary of the Slack-Jaw Words and Whangdoodle Ways of the American West" by Ramon F. Adams (Houghton Mifflin, New York, 2000. Copyright 1936). Page 216.

Hotter than Methodist hell - About as hot as it can get; an expression used chiefly in Maine. 1. Very drunk. 2. Very hot weather or anything hot. Yankee Talk chapter,"Facts on File Dictionary of American Regionalisms: Local Expressions from Coast to Coast" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 2000). Page 244.

Hotter than the brass hinges of hell - Sounds like the door of hell to me. However: hinges of hell - farthest reaches of hell. From "Dictionary of American Regional English," Volume II, D-H, by Frederic G. Cassidy and Joan Houston Hall (1991, Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, England). Page 1016.

Hotter'n a burnt boot -- From "Cowboy Lingo: A Dictionary of the Slack-Jaw Words and Whangdoodle Ways of the American West" by Ramon F. Adams (Houghton Mifflin, New York, 2000. Copyright 1936). Page 216.

Hotter'n a skunk - 1. Very drunk. 2. Very hot weather or anything hot. From the Yankee Talk chapter,"Facts on File Dictionary of American Regionalisms: Local Expressions from Coast to Coast" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 2000). Page 244.

Hotter'n love in hayin' time - Extremely hot. Cited as a common expression in George Allen England, "Rural Locutions of Main and Northern New Hampshire," Dialect Notes, Vol. IV . 1. Very drunk. 2. Very hot weather or anything hot. Yankee Talk chapter, "Facts on File Dictionary of American Regionalisms: Local Expressions from Coast to Coast" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 2000). Page 244.

So hot that when you dig up potatoes, they're already baked -- Online discussion forum, July 19, 2006.

So hot you had to feed the hens cracked ice - "I seen it so hot till you had to feed the hens cracked ice to keep them from laying hard-boiled eggs." Richard Edwards in "Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-Tales from the Gulf States" by Zora Neale Hurston, HarperCollinsPublishers, New York, 2002.