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Re: Getting over on

Posted by Bob on July 01, 2005

In Reply to: Re: Getting over on posted by Smokey Stover on July 01, 2005

: : : : : : : : : what is meaning "getting over on" ?? I've heard used several different ways.

: : : : : : : : It means lying and not getting caught.

: : : : : : : Bruce is likely right. I had a distinct notion that it was used (but not in the U.S.) to mean "getting an advantage over," or "getting the better of." Lying to someone successfully would fit that description. Is this expression more common in Britain? SS

: : : : : : In the UK and Ireland, the phrase would be 'getting ONE over on' which is used to mean what SS said.

: : : : : : DFG

: : : : : In the US, we'd say "putting one over on." Same sense?

: : : : As a charitable act, Lori should give us one or two examples that she has read or heard. "Putting one over on someone" is indeed a common expression. But Lori's question had to do with "getting over on," and my suspicion is that this form of words is used in the U.K. with a distinct meaning. I'm not certain what that is, and the OED is no help. True, it contains hundreds of expressions with "getting" or "get," but I looked pretty diligently with no success. Over to you, Lori. Unless, of course, Bruce has a source that he's willing to share. SS

: : : For what it is worth, I have never heard the form 'getting over on' in the UK or Ireland: this does not, of course, mean that it isn't used.

: : : DFG

: : Here in NY "getting over" is a very popular phrase meaning to fool, lie to or deceive someone.

: : My sources are people--just listening to people and the context in which the phrase is used.

: : No biggie.

: Bruce, your answer is fine. I didn't need a printed source, just "where did you hear it?" By NY I assume that either NYC is meant, or Downstate NY, which includes the lower Hudson Valley and Long Island as well as NYC. It's part of our American folkways, I guess. I remember the first time I heard the phrase "stand on line." It, too, sounded pretty alien to me. It still does. SS

Likewise "waiting on someone" versus the "waiting for someone" I grew up hearing. It always reminded me of some big lug with hobnail boots standing on somebody lying down. The lug is, of course, looking at his watch. "Waiting on" is mostly midwestern and southern American. "Waiting for" is the balance of the country ... and (can one assume?) the rest of the English-speaking world.