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Re: Gone fishing

Posted by Anders on May 01, 2005

In Reply to: Re: Gone fishing posted by James Briggs on May 01, 2005

: : : : : Meaning of the phrase "gone fishing" or its origin. Does it just mean gone out for a while or has it another meaning as well?

: : : : It was a song sung by Louis Armstrong and Bing Crosby in the 40s and 50s. It signified a way of getting away from the hundrum, routine of life and doing something interesting! Whether the title was original, or used a recognised phrase, I know not. Others may.

: : : I don't know for sure. But I am guessing that its origin is the sign "Gone fishing" that a shopkeeper, etc., puts on his door. And its meaning is -- I am taking a little break from the normal routine.

: The sign suggestion certainly fits very well with the lyric - 'there's a sign upon my door - gone fishing'. Surely the origin?

This reminds me of Shades of Blue, a Danish blues band, and their album. "On a mission from Muddy Waters." It's a VERY long time ago since I last heard it (and I don't have it with me here), but I believe there's a line saying, emphatically, "I'm going fishing!" Googling for it, I discovered that the name of the song is "Fishing Blues." Surely, it must be a Muddy track, but I stumbled on a different tune with same title by blues man Taj Mahal. The tenses are different though - here it's not "gone fishing" but "I'm a-goin' fishin'" In the context of Shades of Blue, I must admit I always imagined it to be some lewd pun. (You know what I'm talkin' 'bout.)