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Re: Now, how about the penny drops?

Posted by Smokey Stover on September 08, 2004

In Reply to: Now, how about the penny drops? posted by Smokey Stover on September 08, 2004

: : : : : Apparently, the "penny dropped" means the same as " the other shoe dropped". What shoe, and why does it's dropping lead to a realization ( I threw-in that vulgar "z" to peeve ya'll troubled by the absence of an "s" in math)?

: : : : From the archives:

: : : : Waiting for the other shoe to drop -- We use this phrase to describe waiting for some expected occurrence. It's my theory that "waiting for the other shoe to drop" is a phenomenon experienced by apartment dwellers. A person in the upstairs apartment is preparing for bed. He sits on the bed, takes off Shoe No. 1 and lets it drop on the uncarpeted floor. Then takes off Shoe No. 2 and lets it drop. This can all be clearly heard by the folks in the downstairs apartment. If there is a long pause after Shoe No. 1 drops, the downstairs people are stuck "waiting for the other shoe to drop." Since I didn't grow up in an apartment, I imagine I saw this "routine" on one of the early TV sit-coms.

: : : : : "Drop the other shoe" . . . "arose from a story about a lodging-house" (Eric Partridge, "A Dictionary of Catch Phrases British and American"). Probably the story preceded the sitcoms, as lodging houses (Amer.: "rooming houses") were no longer so common by the time TV came around, and humor writers have been known to adapt old jokes when they need material. I heard the joke as a child in the 1950s. Basically the same as the sitcom version, except the man downstairs is trying to sleep...Here's the story: A man who lives on an upper floor of a rooming house comes home late at night and starts to undress. First he takes off one shoe and drops it loudly on the floor, waking up the man in the room below. Then he remembers to be quiet. He takes off the other shoe and sets it down carefully and silently. After a long interval, his neighbor, who has been lying awake all this time, yells up, "For God's sake, drop the other shoe!"

: : : Platypus, I've never heard the 'shoe dropping' example before, but I love my 'zeds'. Theoretically here in Australia our version of English and spelling has traditionally tended towards the English (although that's changing now, I notice that my stepdaughter pronounces zed as zee - yikes!). So that theoretically means that we're supposed to spell our realizes as realise, but I have always broken that rule, coz I love my zeds. Z is just such a great letter. It looks good and sounds really cool too. And it's the foundation for every good advertising illustrator and tech writers' page layouts.

:
: In the U.S., pennies don't drop. I think I know why they do in the UK, but I want to hear it from someone British. Or someone Australian, if they drop there. SS

Sorry, I'm busy trying to get the foot out of my mouth. I overlooked the previous thread about pennies, and also the search box. Never mind!