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Re: Intelligence/intellect

Posted by Lewis on July 02, 2004

In Reply to: Re: Intelligence/intellect posted by R. Berg on July 02, 2004

: : : Could you pinpoint the difference between inspite and despite.

: : : Intelligence and Intellect.

: : I don't think I can. Here's what it says at Merriam-Webster:

: : in spite of : in defiance or contempt of : without being prevented by

: : Main Entry: 3 despite
: : Function: preposition
: : : in spite of -- Played despite an injury.

: : Main Entry: in.tel.lect
: : Pronunciation: 'in-t&l-"ekt
: : Function: noun
: : Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin intellectus, from intellegere to understand -- more at INTELLIGENT
: : 1 a : the power of knowing as distinguished from the power to feel and to will : the capacity for knowledge b : the capacity for rational or intelligent thought especially when highly developed
: : 2 : a person with great intellectual powers

: : Main Entry: in.tel.li.gence
: : Pronunciation: in-'te-l&-j&n(t)s
: : Function: noun
: : Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin intelligentia, from intelligent-, intelligens intelligent
: : 1 a : the ability to learn or understand or to deal with new or trying situations : REASON; also : the skilled use of reason : the ability to apply knowledge to manipulate one's environment or to think abstractly as measured by objective criteria (as tests) b Christian Science : the basic eternal quality of divine Mind c : mental acuteness : SHREWDNESS
: : 2 a : an intelligent entity; especially : ANGEL b : intelligent minds or mind
: : 3 : the act of understanding : COMPREHENSION
: : 4 a : INFORMATION, NEWS b : information concerning an enemy or possible enemy or an area; also : an agency engaged in obtaining such information
: : 5 : the ability to perform computer functions
:
: "Inspite" isn't a word.

True, but not entirely helpful... "in spite of" - has become less emphatic - 'spite' is a strong word akin to 'viciousness'. to do something 'in spite' or 'out of spite' is petty nastiness. I would not be at all surprised if 'spite' came from 'spit' - to spit at something - to show disdain for. 'in spite of' and 'despite' are virtually identical in usage - and simply say that an action is being undertaken although there are contrary factors.