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I'm outta here..............

Posted by Ward on April 24, 2004

In Reply to: Re: Gone like a long dog posted by ESC on April 23, 2004

: : : : : : : : Any input please on the origins of
: : : : : : : 1. bug out for the dugout ( late 50's beat? )
: : : : : : : 2. vamoose ( Spanish perhaps? )
: : : : : : : 3. split ( 60's hip? )
: : : : : : : Any additional words and phrases of similar meaning would be appreciated.

: : : : : : I'll look in my youth slang books this evening. How about:

: : : : : : Beat feet.
: : : : : : Beat cheeks.
: : : : : : Heel-toe it.
: : : : : : Make like an egg and beat it.
: : : : : : Make like a tree and leave.
: : : : : : Make like horse**** and hit the trail.
: : : : : : Make like a hockey player and get the puck out of here.
: : : : : Many thanks ESC!

: : : : Make like a drum and beat it.
: : : : "I'm off like a prom dress"
: : : : Make like a shepard and get the flock out of here.
: : : : As Yogi bear would say, "Let's beat a hasty retreat."
: : : : Let's bounce outta here.
: : : : Let's hit it.
: : : : Let's hit the road, toad.

: : : Split - Meaning "to leave." Listed under three chapters: The Beat Counterculture of the 1950s (Page 93); The Hippie Counterculture of the 1960s (Page 149) and The 1970s and 1980s (Page 185). Variations: "split the scene" and "split the scene and leave it clean" are under The Mainstream 1960s. Page 121. From "Flappers 2 Rappers: American Youth Slang" by Tom Dalzell (Merriam-Webster Inc., Springfield, Md., 1996)

: : : Another variation: split, no-tomorrow style. Page 155. From "Straight from the Fridge, Dad: A Dictionary of Hipster Slang" by Max Décharné (Broadway Books, Random House, New York, 2000).

: : : Another reference gives "split" a much earlier date: "split, 1787. This was again considered very modern slang in the 1940s and 1950s." Also, this reference has: "vamoose (Spanish) vamos, let's go), 1840s." Page 314. "I Hear America Talking" by Stuart Berg Flexner (Von Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, 1976).

: : Haven't found the exact phrase. But I found this:

: : BUG OUT, TO - "To leave suddenly or rapidly. The term probably originated in World War II and came into wide use during the Korean War. By the mid-1950s it was also civilian slang." Page 44. From "Fighting Words: From War, Rebellion, and other Combative Capers" by Christine Ammer (NTC Publishing Group, Chicago, Ill., 1989, 1999).

: I forgot to add my favorite:

: GONE LIKE A LONG DOG - Leave in a hurry. Long dog probably means a greyhound, either the breed of dog or the Greyhound Lines (the bus company). A related phrase: "riding the dog" means taking a Greyhound bus.

: Then there's -- let's blow this Popsicle stand, pop stand, lemonade stand, taco stand, hotdog stand OR this fire trap.

:: I'm outta here......... I'm history........shuffle off to Buffalo