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Re: Larrup, larruping, larripin

Posted by ESC on February 16, 2004

In Reply to: Larripin! posted by Henry on February 15, 2004

: : My mom comes up with interesting sayings...one is something like "and after that out of all whooping"
: : Any idea where that originated? Also the word "larripin" (sp?) meaning very delicious.

: Larripin is in this list of Appalachian English. Where did your Mom come from?http://www.westga.edu/~dnewton/engl2000/app.html Standard American English>Appalachian Equivalent
: good health >> stout
: inferior >> sorry
: much >> heap
: small bag >> poke
: very good >> larripin

LARRUP/LARRUPING/LARRIPIN - There are several related entries in this reference. Larrup, a verb from the 1800s meaning to strike, thrash, whip and 2. to thrash around or to walk in a heavy, shambling manner 3. slouching and 4. larrup into - pitch in and do. Larrup, a noun, a switch or whip , molasses or syrup . And larruping or larripin, 1. especially of food: delicious, larruping good. By analogy with whopping, thumping and 2. too sweet to be good, cloying . The locations are all over the map: Texas, Vermont, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, the Appalachians, etc. From the "Dictionary of American Regional English," Volume III by Frederic G. Cassidy and Joan Houston Hall (1996, Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, England).