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Balls and chops

Posted by Word Camel on November 05, 2003

In Reply to: Re: Idiomatic expressions posted by ESC on November 04, 2003

: : : : : 1. Do you keep the dog in the kitchen or does
: : : : : he have the run of the house? Is he restricted to
: : : : : one area or can he go everywhere? Merriam
: : : : : Webster online: RUN 2 a : to go without
: : : : : restraint : move freely about at will. Let chickens
: : : : : run loose.

: : : !!!
: : : Thanks a lot - I've completely missed that out.
: : : so, "we're to give him the run of the farm"="we're to allow him to move freely at our facility"

: : : : : 2 : a house or apartment open for inspection
: : : : : especially by prospective buyers or tenants

: : : Yep.

: : : And the next one - Anderton has a conversation with a drug dealer in order to acquire some stuff:

: : : "- Don't bust my balls. You've only given me four, and some of these are duds."

: : : "Don't bust my balls"="don't spoil my pleasure"?

: : Balls refers to testicles. But you probably knew that. It's not about pleasure -- it's more about status. I would say that busting someone's balls is to humiliate the person, take away his or her power or standing. Emasculate him (or her). Anyone have a better explanation?

: And sometimes doesn't it mean hassle someone, give him or her a hard time, the "run around"?

I think busting someone's chops is the same idea. Maybe chops is a polite way of saying it.