phrases, sayings, idioms and expressions at

Phrases, Sayings and Idioms Home > Discussion Forum

Gentlemen....

Posted by Sphinx on August 28, 2003

In Reply to: Re: "Called Million" posted by R. Berg on August 27, 2003

: : : : : Did you know this book of Macro, "The book of Marco Polo, Citizen of Venice, Called Million, Wherein is Recounted the Wonders of the World"?

: : : : : The title is so long! And could you know how to explain "Called Million, Wherein is Recounted the Wonders of the World"?

: : : : : Another question:
: : : : : "Marco Polo made progress in the Khan Kublai's favor; he studied Mongol language and was entrusted by the emperor with various missions to parts of the realm."

: : : :
: : : : : why we cannot use "was charged by the emperor with" here?

: : : : I don't see why not. Or "was sent by the emperor on various missions to parts of the realm."

: : : : Why were titles so long? Was it part of marketing strategy in those days before mass media?

: : Many non-fiction books today use long titles, too, but normally broken into a title, and a sub-title which hopes to tease buyers with a taste of the contents.

: : I see a difference between "entrusted" with missions (because the emperor trusted him) and "charged" (because the emperor ordered him or directed him. It's a small difference, but Marco wanted to emphasize how close he had become to Kubla Kahn, earning his trust. (Helps sell books.)

: On "marketing strategy":

: I believe sphinx is right. A title like that is an advertisement for the book.

: It was a more leisurely age, at least for the upper class, who bought books. People today are in a hurry. They won't stay to read a title that doesn't deliver its message at a glance.

Thank you for your help on marketing strategy, but could you just explain "Called Million, Wherein is Recounted the Wonders of the World" in its title? What is this title saying?
I'm at a loss with it!