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Mudroom/ Greatroom

Posted by Word Camel on May 05, 2002

In Reply to: Re: Mudroom posted by ESC on May 05, 2002

: : : There seem to be a number of Americans contributing to this forum (I'm English). I wonder if one of you helpful people can tell me if the word "mudroom" is a normal American word, and what it means. It appears in the novel I'm currently reading (Some Things That Stay by Sarah Willis) and as far as I can make out it is a room off the kitchen where you might take your muddy boots off - in which case the nearest word we have might be "utility room". But it's not in any dictionary I've looked in so I wonder how much of a current word it is.

: : : Armorel

: : Yes, it's a common word. I believe it's a modern term. Mudroom means a room where people take off their muddy boots, hang up coats, put school books, etc., on a shelf.

: I couldn't find "mudroom" in my references. It's a middle class/upper middle class type of thing. Poor folks just have to put up with mud being tracked in the house.

I first heard mudroom on the east coast. Out west we usually referred to this area as "the back porch". I'd never heard it before, but now it seems to be every where. I think it might have to do with the late 90's boom in remodeling.

Another term I've come across recently is "greatroom". A "greatroom" - as far as I can work out is a sort of cavernous room just off the foyer with high ceilings with multiple seating areas for different activities that take the place of what might have been separate rooms once upon a time. I think it's supposed to be rather like the great hall of a castle. *cringe* Most examples I have seen are in California.