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Re: Wind up at manager's

Posted by R. Berg on January 14, 2002

In Reply to: Re: Wind up at manager's posted by Acerbic on January 14, 2002

: : : : In the film "Will success spoil Rock
: : : : Hunter?" someone says: "Fame hits hard at
: : : : first, but you'll get so you love it - or wind up at manager's." Que?
: : : : Anyone have a clue what they're talking about?

: : : : Niklas

: : : It's just a meaningless, pointless, forgettable, badly written script fragment from an old second rate 'B' movie: who cares what it means? It is, as Stephen Fry was recently heard to say, 'A Fart of nonsense'.

: :
: : Nonsense Old Fart!

: : Meaningless? Pointless? Forgettable? Badly written? I don't think so - and not a 'B' movie at all. 'Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?' was one of the first American films to parody the public obsession with stardom, television and the excesses of the advertising industry and corporate culture. Light-hearted and up-beat, it did this more cleverly and with more originalty than most American films, then or now.

: : As for the origin of the phrase, I haven't had any luck finding a reference to it. I suspect it may have been early advertising industry jargon, and as such may be lost forever - unless anyone knows any New York advertising men - probably in thier late 60's or early 70's.

: : Niklas, I shall keep my eye out for you.

: To be more clever and original than most American movies is no great achievement. To be so clever and original that barely anyone remembers the movie, much less its convoluted dialogue, is an epitaph any studio could well do without.

Dear Camel: No point arguing with someone who gargles with vinegar.